Forum No.14
4th Mar 2017

Forum No.14
4th Mar 2017

Forum No.14
4th Mar 2017

Forum No.14
4th Mar 2017

Forum No.14
4th Mar 2017

COLLABORATION | JOINS BRAIN AND MUSCLE

COLLABORATION | JOINS BRAIN AND MUSCLE

COLLABORATION | JOINS BRAIN AND MUSCLE

COLLABORATION | JOINS BRAIN AND MUSCLE

COLLABORATION | JOINS BRAIN AND MUSCLE

Forum_12

FILMAKER
Nitin Das

ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox

FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala

FILMAKER
Nitin Das

ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox

FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala

FILMAKER
Nitin Das

ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox

FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala

FILMAKER
Nitin Das

ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox

FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala

FILMAKER
Nitin Das

ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox

FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala

FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal

ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna

FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal

ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna

FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal

ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna

FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal

ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna

FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal

ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna

FILMAKER
Nitin Das
FILMAKER
Nitin Das
FILMAKER
Nitin Das
FILMAKER
Nitin Das
FILMAKER
Nitin Das
02-Nitin-Das-March-2017

  

Nitin Das, an IIM graduate was former brand manager for India Today. Nitin has made films for India’s leading non-profits and corporations, and is the winner of a British Council award for creative entrepreneurship in the social sector.

Nitin today is a wandering filmmaker. He tells stories of extraordinary people and places through humble yet very thought provoking short films. His website, Healing Forest is a journey to discover the magical healing powers of nature and the meaning of true wealth. The essence of his mission is to find ways to reconnect people with nature through stories, films and walks. In a world suffering from consumerism and materialism, his aims are simple. Helping people heal. Helping forests heal.

Nitin’s films make us question if we are actually rich by earning money. Money as he establishes, is just paper. As a species, our growth has increased tremendously but we have had very little time to look back and remind ourselves that a part of us belongs in the forest. Most of us have been born and brought up in cities. We have never had anyone tell us how precious forests are or Mother Nature is because we are surrounded by equally unaware people. Nitin Das helps us realize that there are places on this earth where one can get away from his or her worries, places where the word ‘”slow” makes sense. We need forests just as much as they need us. Without a constant check on their well being, it is very possible that we might not have forests anymore.

Written by Agnisesh Setlur

  

Nitin Das, an IIM graduate was former brand manager for India Today. Nitin has made films for India’s leading non-profits and corporations, and is the winner of a British Council award for creative entrepreneurship in the social sector.

Nitin today is a wandering filmmaker. He tells stories of extraordinary people and places through humble yet very thought provoking short films. His website, Healing Forest is a journey to discover the magical healing powers of nature and the meaning of true wealth. The essence of his mission is to find ways to reconnect people with nature through stories, films and walks. In a world suffering from consumerism and materialism, his aims are simple. Helping people heal. Helping forests heal.

Nitin’s films make us question if we are actually rich by earning money. Money as he establishes, is just paper. As a species, our growth has increased tremendously but we have had very little time to look back and remind ourselves that a part of us belongs in the forest. Most of us have been born and brought up in cities. We have never had anyone tell us how precious forests are or Mother Nature is because we are surrounded by equally unaware people. Nitin Das helps us realize that there are places on this earth where one can get away from his or her worries, places where the word ‘”slow” makes sense. We need forests just as much as they need us. Without a constant check on their well being, it is very possible that we might not have forests anymore.

Written by Agnisesh Setlur

ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox
ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox
ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox
ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox
ART CRITIC, CURATOR & WRITER
Georgina Maddox
01-Georgina-March-2017

  

Georgina Maddox is an art critic and a curator; she is currently engaged with Art Explore. Georgina engaging presentation took us through a journey of her multi-dimensional work. After studying Art History from Baroda, Georgina went on to study Mass Communication from Bombay and began her career as a journalist. Her natural bent towards the Arts penetrated into her writing paving her path towards becoming a curator.

Recently, Georgina curated a show at the Kalakriti Art Gallery in Hyderabad, on technology, art and gender, showing works of some of the most prominent artists in the country. The theme of the exhibition was to bring feminist ideologies in conversation with technology, exploring technology from a gender-sensitive point of view. Georgina’s interest in gender came across in many of the shows curated by her. ‘Minimalism in Photography’ at India Habitat Centre, New Delhi was a revelation. It showcased photographers in our country working with minimalism, contrary to the plethora of images that portray sounds, colors and cultural wealth of our country. The audience found ‘Red Moon Songs’ especially intriguing. It talked about how the woman’s menstrual cycle was considered auspicious and a powerful phase in the olden times. It was interesting to view works by various artists which interpreted the revival and celebration of the feminine principle. Another show called Super Power, brought Fulbright Scholars exploring India through subjects such as the third gender.

Georgina was also the critic in Residence for KHOJ residency where the artists in residence explored analog photography, pinhole cameras and other techniques, involving children from around the area. A room was converted to Camera Obscura revisiting these dying or challenged forms of photography. Other shows curated by her were Inside Out, Pixel Power and some which involved performance artists. Parallel to her work as a curator, she continues writing articles as an art critic.

Written by Sarah Kaushik

FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala
FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala
FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala
FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala
FOUNDER
Ashdeen Lilaowala
03-Ashdeen-Lilaowala-March-2017

  

Ashdeen’s talk was divided into two aspects of his work. One highlighted the key components of his research on Parsi gara embroidery, which in turn inspires his designs of contemporary garments as a part of his practice.

The in-depth research intended to trace the roots and factors has inspired the gara embroidery amongst the “endangered” Parsi communities in India. The influences were traced back to China and Iran during the trading days. Many motifs were reused and Ashdeen showed us comparative references, which validate the nuances of this particular style of embroidery.

One can see how traditional motifs resonate when re-appropriated in his contemporary designs. In fact, it was interesting to see how Ashdeen had created the scenography for his photo-shoot, replicating the age old Parsi tradition of staged portraits in photo studios.

His know how of these traditions has now inspired many contemporary designs, which Ashdeen continues to explore in his practice as a fashion designer. His understanding of the subject and sharp sense of styling is definitely making meaningful strides in reviving the slowly disappearing art of gara embroidery.

Written by Surajit Ranjan Das

FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal
FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal
FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal
FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal
FOUNDER
Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal
Lopez-Design_Rekha-Bajpe-Aggarwal-March-2017_1

 

Rekha Bajpe Aggarwal who hails from Mangalore was born in Chennai. Her family has always been immersed in the arts, and from a young age, creating and making things were an intrinsic part of life. In school, she used to participate in dance, theatre and debates. In college she studied economics, but she also played sports. As president of National Sports Organisation she organised seminars on ‘Women and Sports’, and she also got an opportunity to write on ‘Fitness’ for a TV channel. This is when she discovered that she loved writing. After college, she got into advertising, when she got a chance to work in a fim production unit. Later she started her own production unit and started making films on her own. At this time, she was introduced to ceramics.

Rekha says that her life is divided into BC and AC (Before Clay and After Clay). A full time filmmaker, ceramics began as a hobby. Eventually, due to time constraints, she decided to focus on ceramics. She realised that she could set up a studio at home and started Studio Re4clay in 1994. Those days, hardly any information was available just 2 to 3 books on ceramics in India. It seemed that cermaic techniques were a guarded secret and learning was difficult. Teachers would say – “learn from what I’m doing”. There was no internet and she was starved for information on this field. She was determined that the studio she started in Gurgaon should be a hub – a one stop place where people could get any information, material, tools, different types of clay, work in the studio and fire in the kiln. She had a tiny desk kiln to start with and an old style kick wheel. Recently she set up a bigger studio in Chattarpur.

Ceramics is a vast field, and Rekha has been through many phases. Initially, she worked with functional ceramics, table ware and then glazes. Slowly she started working with the theme of nature, such as dragon flies and autumn leaves. We saw how a single glaze could give a myriad of colours – what goes in the kiln and what comes out is totally different. This kind of magic attracted her to ceramics.

We saw her work on various themes such as global warming, series of rock and series of masks, raku technique which gives a metallic look, installations, murals, architectural and sculptural pieces. Rekha writes poems alongside the work. Apart from making things in ceramics, she teaches and takes classes in her studio for beginners, conducts corporate workshops, teaches kids in schools, organisations and various different types of groups. She writes about ceramics in magazines and blogs. She started the magazine called Indian Ceramic Quarterly, which was funded by Delhi Blue Pottery Trust. She has been involved in the field for 18 years and has been in touch with ceramic artists all over India and abroad. She has made efforts to connect the potters’ community on social media too.

Rekha curates shows on ceramics and organises various events such as lectures, demonstrations and workshops. She has documented the history and techniques of traditional pottery. She also conducts workshops with traditional potters, and has set up a residency space. Her aim is to give training to traditional potters on how to teach in schools, do commissioned work, while also modernising their work to some extend.

Written by Deekshit Sebastian

ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna
ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna
ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna
ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna
ARTIST & PHOTOGRAPHER
Ratna Khanna
Lopez-Design_Ratna-Khanna-March-2017_1

  

Ratna was the fifth speaker at the March forum. An artist and photographer based out of Delhi, she formally trained in drawing, painting, sculpture and printmaking. She later studied photography at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and then Rochester Institute of Technology. A multimedia artist, Ratna likes to work with several mediums that reflect her ideas. She even welds occasionally as she finds it relaxing. Over the years she has won many awards and most recently the Prudential Eye Awards in Photography. She had her first solo show in India at Galerie Mirchandani + Steinruecke in Mumbai last year.

Ratna presented her work on both art and photography. In photography she uses landscape as a medium and builds objects to infuse in the environment. Ratna wanted to ‘make photographs’and not take photographs, and this started off her experiments with objects and materials. She loves fragile materials like glass and mirror, and uses them to curate her images. She started welding structures in the shape of billboards reminding us of their ubiquitous presence. The reflection on these mirror billboards creates interesting patterns. For the viewer it is a visual delight as the images are minimalist in nature. The play of light and reflections are equally stimulating.

Ratna’s drawings are a reflection of what she sees, especially the environment, the flora and fauna. The drawings just like her photographs, are minimalist in nature and the detailing simply beautiful.

Written by Ankita Singh

EMAIL

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mail us at info@lopezdesign.com

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mail us at careers@lopezdesign.com

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday



STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday