Forum No.15
1st Apr 2017

Forum No.15
1st Apr 2017

Forum No.15
1st Apr 2017

Forum No.15
1st Apr 2017

Forum No.15
1st Apr 2017

COLLABORATION | MAKES YOU STRONGER

COLLABORATION | MAKES YOU STRONGER

COLLABORATION | MAKES YOU STRONGER

COLLABORATION | MAKES YOU STRONGER

COLLABORATION | MAKES YOU STRONGER

Forum_10

DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand

ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada

SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR
Sunil Mehra

MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas

DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand

ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada

SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR
Sunil Mehra

MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas

DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand

ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada

SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR
Sunil Mehra

MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas

DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand

ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada

SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR
Sunil Mehra

MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas

DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand

ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada

SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR
Sunil Mehra

MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas

JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal

LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez

ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya

URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan

JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal

LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez

ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya

URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan

JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal

LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez

ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya

URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan

JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal

LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez

ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya

URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan

JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal

LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez

ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya

URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan

DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand
DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand
DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand
DEVELOPMENT & MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand
DEVELOPMENT &
MULTIMEDIA SPECIALIST
Anita Anand
Anita-Anand-April-2017

  

Anita is a multi-specialty artist with a career in development communications and advocacy. With her travels across the world she has developed a deep appreciation of how people are connected by humanity and their art, crafts, religion and stories. Looking back on her journey so far, Anita Anand noted that she was lucky to get inspiration in different ways with a privileged childhood and Catholic education. Early on in her career she became interested in development, starting with rural development in India and continuing to working on related issues.

Anita’s talk was around ‘inspiration’ and how you can involve people with this approach. She has been involved with serious public issues like maternal mortality, sanitation and property rights. This, as Anita emphasized, is left brain work which requires clear logic and analysis.

After her stint in the human development and advocacy sector, Anita began to figure out what is next in life? This miraculously took her on another journey, propitiously, the beginning of becoming a multi-specialty artist. Anita has written many books, fiction and nonfiction, which includes children’s illustrated books such as Cholo Kolkata and The Beauty Game. Kabul Blogs-My days in the life of Afghanistan her latest book, is about her experience in Afghanistan while she was invited to work on a media and gender assessment project.

With the shift in her life she realised the left and right side of the brain have a very good marriage, as she has been challenged externally to stretch herself. These are also opportunities Anita has given herself. On another note, Anita enjoys watercolours and photography; nature is her favourite subject and source of inspiration. Anita was a passionate speaker and her life journey was fascinating and exciting, truly motivating.

Written by Ankita Singh

  

Anita is a multi-specialty artist with a career in development communications and advocacy. With her travels across the world she has developed a deep appreciation of how people are connected by humanity and their art, crafts, religion and stories. Looking back on her journey so far, Anita Anand noted that she was lucky to get inspiration in different ways with a privileged childhood and Catholic education. Early on in her career she became interested in development, starting with rural development in India and continuing to working on related issues.

Anita’s talk was around ‘inspiration’ and how you can involve people with this approach. She has been involved with serious public issues like maternal mortality, sanitation and property rights. This, as Anita emphasized, is left brain work which requires clear logic and analysis.

After her stint in the human development and advocacy sector, Anita began to figure out what is next in life? This miraculously took her on another journey, propitiously, the beginning of becoming a multi-specialty artist. Anita has written many books, fiction and nonfiction, which includes children’s illustrated books such as Cholo Kolkata and The Beauty Game. Kabul Blogs-My days in the life of Afghanistan her latest book, is about her experience in Afghanistan while she was invited to work on a media and gender assessment project.

With the shift in her life she realised the left and right side of the brain have a very good marriage, as she has been challenged externally to stretch herself. These are also opportunities Anita has given herself. On another note, Anita enjoys watercolours and photography; nature is her favourite subject and source of inspiration. Anita was a passionate speaker and her life journey was fascinating and exciting, truly motivating.

Written by Ankita Singh

ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada
ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada
ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada
ARTIST & DESIGNER
Valay Gada
Valay-Gada-April-2017

  

Designer and artist, Valay Gada started his journey with design in NIFT while specialising in Fashion Accessories and Lifestyle Design. Since his graduation project Valay has been working extensively with metal as his primary material. Overtime a love to work with metal developed within him. He established Cobalt Designs in 2012 where Valay’s love for metal and its alloys continued to surface. The properties of metal, the versatility of the material, whether through machine or hand done, the kind of processes that go with it are what draw Valay towards the material. He puts metal across as a feminine character, someone who ‘ages with grace’ and how the grace has a permanence attached to it. Over the course of Valay’s presentation, one realises how deep his engagement with metal has been, his biophilic nature and his further experiments with a soft material.

Valay’s primary work showcases a series of lights, tables, chairs, mirrors and many more products. Every project reflects a deeper concept within it, allowing people to interpret along with admiring the beauty and craftsmanship of his works. His concepts tend to stem from varied sources which finally get translated into a product. Like looking at exile and homecoming from a Diwali perspective; pulling out symbols, which represent a pain that makes one resilient and finally translating it into a light. Looking at cross sections of stems under a microscope and vascular systems of plants and using at the reflective property of metal to advantage. One of the projects also showcase a playful take on the 1930’s slaughtered angles in a stool.

One Valay’s main sources of inspiration is looking at an everyday object present at his workshop and reimagining it in a different light. He designed a set of coffee tables inspired by Islamic and Christian architecture. Imbibing the style of arches into the furniture and thereby building a metaphorical portal that transports you to Medina. Valay also takes previously designed objects like the Frank Lloyd chair and gives it his own flavour. One of his products show a juxtaposition by putting the holy water of the Ganges in copper made jerry cans. For another project he took inspiration from the festival Diwali being the end of the financial year and integrated that with a pie-chart thereby creating a thali for dry fruits. A solo show in Mumbai shows the concept of urbanisation and habitat destruction. How ‘city forests’ and buildings come up in areas along with roads that look like termite tubes which pull out resources from the city. Using a beautiful aerial view only to show the ground reality of how we are hollowing a city out completely. He also brought in critique from a child’s point of view and built an engaging narrative into the artwork about the environment that society is giving them. The entire show included subliminal messaging, which said that if one tampers with nature then nature will take over.

Valay has also conducted a Sikki grass workshop, facilitated by the World Bank and Asian Heritage Foundation in Madhubani, Bihar. This workshop was a contrast in the material being used. Valay shifted to using a softer material, grass when compared to metal. He developed lights using multiplicity as a factor, created fun products that are interactive in nature. The products were all hand woven and dyed. Further experiments also included costume jewelry, which are rather fun pieces. He integrated typography within the jewelry. The women he worked with loved it too as the product was something which they understood.

Written by Shivani

SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR
Sunil Mehra
SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR
Sunil Mehra
SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR
Sunil Mehra
SENIOR JOURNALIST & YOGA INSTRUCTOR

Sunil Mehra
Sunil-Mehra-April-2017

  

Journalist Sunil Mehra introduced to us the 12th century Urdu oral storytelling art form called Dastangoi. He explained that “Dastan” is a Persian word which means a tale while “Dastangoi” means to tell a tale. “Dastango” is the person who narrates the story.

Dastangos were brought into the Mughal court following the tradition of the Persian court, and Dastangoi flourished. This continued till the tumult of Nadir Shah’s invasions, when there was a mutiny and the Mughal Empire began crumbling. Most of the Dastangos migrated as patronage had dried up, and they went to Lucknow, Awadh. Dastan Goi took on a new avatar. It started to be performed in Awadhi and many Hindustani and local indigenous Dastangos entered the scene.

Sunil Mehra shared how all our traditions have been oral: a Dastan becomes a Dastan because they are made long before “The Dastan”. For instance, one of the earliest printed Dastans called – Dastan e Amir Hamza was recited for many years before it was finally printed.

The art form is estimated to have died with the demise of the last Dastango of Delhi, Mir Baqar Ali. Today, whatever we know of Dastan Goi is thanks to Shamsur Rahman Faruqi and his nephew, writer and director Mahmood Faruqi. 

Before performing an entertaining Dastangoi, Sunil Mehra shared an evocative argument about his passion for Dantangoi. Some excerpts: 

“The question?  What prompted a middle aged journalist/ curator/  documentary filmmaker/  television producer/ author/ yoga teacher/ one time prof of literature in English  turn to Dastangoi? In Urdu? Seemingly whimsical choice, that…

Many reasons

The first: a passion for languages, specifically Urdu. This was the surround sound of my growing up years in what seems now like another time, another country . In a home where syncretism was not political shibboleth, slogan, emblem but a reflex. One grew up in a home where language was a doorway to beauty, to another world, another way of living and being and conducting yourself. NOT a value.

It was never ” dekhiye hamara Baccha kitni aachi angrezi bolta hai” . Instead one was always told ” Jo bhi Zubaan bolo, saaf bolo”. One grew up in a surround sound of delicious Urdu, lilting idiomatic Hindi with the charming UP inflection that came courtesy my Lucknow Dad, some robust earthy Multani courtesy my Punjabi mom and ofcourse Hindi and English which was my spoken language through eleven years of Jesuit school. I was rich: revelling early in Zauq, Mir, Ghalib, Faiz, whose couplets my father’s friends conversations were peppered with, responding intuitively to the lyric appeal of Bulle Shah, Waris Hussain, Sahir Ludhianvi, Amrita Pritams poetry that my mother revelled in; delighting in the music and majesty of Shakspeare , the whimsy of Wodehouse courtesy my superlative teachers in school who introduced me early to the romance of the English language.

Looking back today it feels like I was raised in mythical Krypton. We live today in an environment where one searches for answers to explain the illogic that “others” people, languages, cultures. Where a cow is Hindu, a goat is Muslim / where Urdu is Muslim, Hindi is Hindu/  where to fall in line with the prevailing doctrine is ” national, to express doubt/ disagree, is to be ” Maoist” , anti national” , where people can riot/ rape/ loot/ pillage/ vandalize / murder at  will because someone’s  ” sentiments are hurt” . . Dabri, Kairana, Muzaffarnagar, just two days ago the burning of a whole Muslim village in Gujrat over a skirmish between two children of different communities, the recent  and ongoing convulsions at JNU and Ramjas, the embrace  of mythology as history , the Ghar wapsi’s, the love jihads, a newly minted CM who endorses ” revenge” necrophilia , sex with the corpses of Muslim women….Jingoism, chauvinism, aggressive advocacy of medievalist patriarchal mindsets intent on subjugating women/ minorities, conscious and deliberately engineered ” othering”  of communities ;whether social/ religious/ political or sexual, blinkered religious nationalism seems to be the order of the day.

Apocalyptic times where one is given to despair. Where are we heading? This has NEVER happened before we kept saying to each other in disbelief. Some of us poured out our anguish in op-ed columns; others raged in the echo chambers of social media, public/ civil discourse with great help from paid trolls plumbed new depths. Media sounded and continues to sound like a HMV LP. Asked to bend in 1975: they crawled. Fast forward to 2014: barring honorable ” anti national” exceptions, the rest lay on their backs kicking their paws up in the air for their new political masters.

Venting my rage on social media as was my wont yielded no answers. Only more frustration. Reading a book on Dastangoi by Mehmood Farooqui, a performer I respect, whose talent I hugely revere, whose intellect I admire, offered direction: he’d brilliantly used the format as a tool to inform, question, challenge, rebel. Dastangoi was a powerful political tool in his hands: using historical narrative, anecdote, memoir he crafted masterful subversive contemporary Dastan’s that challenged every prevailing orthodoxy. Dastan e Sedition, Dastan e Taqsim e Hind speak with lacerating directness of the deviousness, the manipulation, the betrayal of the people by the State. He put me in the mind of the Shakspearean joker who even as he entertained and regaled his audience, called out falsehood, cant, duplicity, spoke truth to power.

As a student of literature it’s clear to me that the cataclysm we’re experiencing today is mere repeat. Such upheavals have always been a part of the cycles of history. How have we dealt with those upheavals? What are the lessons we could learn? They too are right there between the pages of books:  chronicles of our times, repositories of our collective wisdom even as we foolishly blunder ahead, uncaring, unmindful, oblivious. The answers are all there in our stories: we just stopped listening/ looking/ reading. 

The Dastango today is not unlike the Shakespearean clown: speaking truth to power in the Age of Post Truth. For me, it’s a wonderful format to deliver powerful, often incendiary, very often uncomfortable, socio-political messages that will, hopefully, resonate even as I tickle and entertain my audience.

A Brechtian character says, and I paraphrase:

But in the dark times will there be singing and dancing?

Yes

There will be singing and dancing

About the dark times….” 

Written by Deekshit Sebastian

MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas
MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas
MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas
MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas
MANAGING PARTNER
Rintu Thomas
Rintu-Thomas-April-2017

 

Rintu Thomas is a woman who commands power and respect. She and her husband own Black Ticket Films, a film agency that reaches out to people who really deserve to be heard. They literally give these people a voice by giving them megaphones.

As a child, Rintu was very good at story telling. She would weave tall tales about what her name meant and make all her friends feel jealous, basking in her own glory all the while. Her interest in story telling only grew as she grew. She buried herself in story books and read her way to power – meaning the power to communicate. She decided to start making documentaries. However, documentaries were not widely viewed by the general Indian population. She and her husband cracked the code with Black Ticket Films. Their documentaries have literally changed lives of people overnight, bringing out the greater side of India.

Black Ticket Films is a wonderful example to demonstrate how a medium of communication can be strong. With a strong medium in the hands of people who truly seek to know more, a sense of hope seeps into our disillusioned human race. ‘Hope’ no longer is a word for the weak. Once I believed that ‘weak’ was just another word for lazy. But the truth is that people who have been forced into a position of weakness is not preventing India from soaring high. The cause for their weakness is the real reason. This is because many people are inconsiderate to others. These feelings come from selfishness, wanting to be more important than others and indulging such petty thoughts. Rintu Thomas’s work inspires us to believe that she can cure this weakness and give the disadvantages a better platform to stand on.

Written by Agnisesh Setlur

JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal
JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal
JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal
JEWELLERY DESIGNER & WRITER
Preeta Agarwal
Preeta-Agarwal-April-2017

  

Dedicated to the cream of the society, Preeta Agarwal’s work is predominantly dedicated towards women. While growing up Preeta was in love with jewelry. She was inspired by a young jewelry designer who lived next to her house and continued her passion by pursuing jewelry design at NIFT, Gandhinagar for her undergraduate. For the initial 7 to 8 years, Preeta was just gathering skills like the technical aspects of products. She began her journey by training under a product designer rather than a specialised jewelry designer. This led to her holistic understanding of how products move from a larger perspective in terms of scale in products to which need the minutest detail.

Her first industry exposure was with the brand Tanishq, where she had to create swords and daggers for the Jodha Akbar movie promotions. These swords were made out of gold and studded with uncut diamonds and rubies. This set was kept at various Tanishq showrooms and eventually got sold out.

Preeta has spent a couple of years working with fine jewelry but, her interest was always with the technical side of the product not towards the “prettiness” of the piece. She would concentrate on making a particular piece more voluminous or more flexible rather than recreating pretty flowers or butterflies. She has also worked on men’s jewelry briefly for a few projects. Apart from fine jewelry Preeta has also worked with costume jewelry. Over the years she has worked with a lot of craftsmen and has experimented with different products. Preeta also worked with a ceramic artist where she used scrap pieces from left over clay and turned them into wearable pieces.

Photography came to Preeta when she was studying. She started off with nature photography and later merged it with product photography. Combining her knowledge of photography with her knowledge of jewelry helped her make the jewelry pieces looks prettier than how the looked in real life. Preeta also styles jewelry for various campaigns; she builds the frame and controls the styling of the product. She builds the story around jewelry collections, names it and directs each and every touchpoint of it to build consistent brand communications.

Preeta has designer jewelry for brands like Tanishq, Ganjam and Mirali but, her interest path started shifting from design towards other sections. She got involved with the marketing, events, writing and PR with the brands while designing jewelry for them. Preeta managed a few fashion shows, wine sessions and kitty parties with the HNI’s of the society. Out of all the explorations Preeta was diving into, writing turned out to be a major part of it. She started writing for jewelry magazines and websites like Forbes India, Bazaar, Solitaire which are luxury specific platforms. Preeta also runs a blog called “Bejeweled Finds” where she talks about pieces which she likes by a certain jeweler or shares articles written by for other magazines. Her first book “The Jewelry Book” talks about trends in fine jewelry. During the course of her writing she got the opportunity to interact with dream brands like Tiffany & Co, whom she had only read about. Preeta’s second book “The International Wedding Jewels” is all about bridal jewelry and is currently available on Amazon and jewelry shows.

In 2016 she started the “Preeta Agarwal Workroom” where she curates all facets of jewelry. Brand consulting, styling, writing, photography, marketing, collaterals, PR- her workroom covers it all the subject being fine jewelry. Though jewelry design has taken a back seat, she continues to guide clients through trend analysis.

Written by Shivani

LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez
LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez
LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez
LIGHTING DESIGNER
Lyle Lopez
Lyle-Lopez-April-2017

  

Lyle’s introduced himself as a ‘Dot Connector’, a very unique way of looking at what he does. In his work, he constantly connects the physics of light with its practical manifestation. Lyle has changed his career thrice in his lifetime and he now runs a lighting design firm in partnership with his brother. He briefly spoke about his contrasting past when he was an aircraft mechanic and everything was done by the book. Lyle began his presentation with a very ‘feminine’ project, as he described, a branch of the building in Aurobindo Ashram in Delhi, dedicated to the Mother that is designed by Sanjay Prakash. Step by step, Lyle took us through the process of how he integrated the lighting fixtures embracing the architecture of the building and retaining the sanctity of the space.

Lyle spoke strongly of the future of lighting where solar energy will be highly utilized to resolve the power problems of the world. He shared his phenomenal insights on possibilities of solar panels. He also spoke about the technologies which are currently in vogue until solar panels come into prominence worldwide and the impact those technologies can have. Furthermore, he spoke about the importance of sunlight in general and how we all crave for it.  Lyle shared experiments in lighting that have been done by mimicking sunlight to create comfortable indoor environments. To further enlighten us, Lyle explained the impact of various colours from the spectrum of light and their effect on our brain, in context to the prismatic nature of the earth. For example, yellow light feels comfortable to sit under in the evening and relax, just like the soothing orange of the sunset.

We were awed to see his methods of piping sunlight into buildings which is now a possibility through solar tubes and other existing devices. He gave us live demonstrations using a spectrometer, a device that informs us of all wavelengths of light in a specific space, comparing light levels and explaining what wholesome light is.

Switching track from the science of light and technologies, Lyle showed us a few examples of retail lighting and how in this case, the process changes from ‘I need’ to ‘I want’ for the savvy global retailer. He also took us through many lighting design projects for art and exhibition displays and galleries: here, we could see examples of multiple ways to light paintings, objects, photographs and displays. One particularly amazing project was a premium jeweller’s museum cum showroom, located in Jaipur,. Lyle was commissioned to design the lighting for the space, reflecting the pristine interiors of the museum. He took us through the whole experience of the museum as one would move from one room to the other in real-time. Through Lyle’s dramatic presentation, we got a first-hand feel of the highly dramatic impact of the lighting. Each space was specially designed to generate the value the owner desired for his collections.

Written by Sarah Kaushik

ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya
ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya
ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya
ARCHITECT & WRITER
Uttiyo Bhattacharya
Uttiyo-Bhattacharya-April-2017

  

Uttiyo Bhattacharya, an architect by training, has extended his professional capacity as a writer, producer and theatre artist. He has worked on architectural and cultural maps for cities and designed spaces for shopping malls, naval bases and museums as well as done digital story telling. He has acted in plays like Macbeth, Waiting for Godot and Woyzyeck. Ba’az of the Bengal lancers, a potboiler in his words, is his upcoming book project based on the war of Independence with character Ba’az as the protagonist. Talks to adapt the novel into a screenplay by prominent production houses at MAMI (Mumbai Academy of Moving Images) are in progress.

Apart from Ba’az he is currently focusing on enhancing digital storytelling experiences and incorporating interactive media for the same. The reader is put in charge of taking decisions for the protagonist at the end of each chapter and the story is designed to evolve as per these decisions made. Every answer will move the story in a different direction, creating different narratives for different readers. This creates a more engaging and personalized experience for the reader where they are the decision makers rather than silent spectators.

Bhattacharya confesses that he may not be naturally talented or versatile, but his command over the design process has given him a certain competitive edge in approaching different tasks and projects. Certainly, there have been several setbacks along the way, but quick wit has readily come to his rescue. His learning has paved the way for future projects. For this creative practitioner, doing things by the book not only gives him assurance, but also a strategic advantage in completing projects and anticipating results. Bhattacharya’s diverse portfolio is a definite attestation to what he says.

Written by Deepika Tiwari

URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan
URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan
URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan
URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan
URBAN DESIGNER & ARCHITECT
Balaji Mohan
Balaji-Mohan-April-2017

  

Balaji Mohan, an architect and urban designer, works on large scale urban development projects. Balaji spoke about the prevailing misconceptions about urban designers, how they are often misunderstood and portrayed as supporting mindless large scale developments for monetary gains. Most blame large scale contractors for the construction and infrastructure boom.

The first project Balaji showed debunks many of these preconceived notions. His explorations with a team of professionals in Ecuador was a community-based intervention to develop the riverfront of a part of a settlement in the city. The workshop aimed at proposing humane solutions to transform the river’s edge involving the community residing along the river. Their approach was to create a participatory workshop with the community rather than a urban development project designed in isolation in an office. The final design presented to the Ecuador government aimed at subtle interventions along the river keeping in mind how the locals would like to use these spaces and the water body.

The Bihar riverfront project on the other hand highlighted the other extreme of the spectrum, where urban designers are expected to deliver large scale development plans that re-imagine the city infrastructure. This project involved a more brutal intervention addressing the functional needs of the riverfront in Bihar. As the end product of a government tender project, it did respond to some fundamental aspects of congregation, circulation, interface with land and water to name a few. However, the process could have been dealt with greater sensibility by involving other professionals to take it overall to a higher platform. It was quite evident that other integral aspects like lighting, signage & wayfinding, public art etc were not considered when the project was being conceived.

Overall, it was exciting to see projects of such a massive scale take shape. In their outcome, urban designs take the mantle of iconic structures of the city which many times, may represent the identity of the nation. All the more reason, one would wish that there is greater care and sensitivity in carrying out such projects.

Written by Surajit Ranjan Das

EMAIL

For business queries
mail us at info@lopezdesign.com

For employment opportunities and internships,
mail us at careers@lopezdesign.com

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday



STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday