Forum No.17
1st Jul 2017

Forum No.17
1st Jul 2017

Forum No.17
1st Jul 2017

Forum No.17
1st Jul 2017

Forum No.17
1st Jul 2017

COLLABORATION | BRAIN + BRAWN

COLLABORATION | BRAIN + BRAWN

COLLABORATION | BRAIN + BRAWN

COLLABORATION | BRAIN + BRAWN

Forum_14

ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit

EDITOR
Omair Ahmad

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl

ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit

EDITOR
Omair Ahmad

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl

ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit

EDITOR
Omair Ahmad

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl

ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit

EDITOR
Omair Ahmad

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl

ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit

EDITOR
Omair Ahmad

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl

ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant

ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha

ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant

ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha

ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant

ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha

ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant

ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha

ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant

ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha

ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit
ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit
ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit
ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER
Harsh Lohit
ARTISANAL FARMING & PHOTOGRAPHER

Harsh Lohit
Harsh-Lohit-July-2017

  

Our first presenter, Harsh Lohit spoke about how farming shared a close relationship with design. Twenty five years in the Indian software industry taught him to deal with processes, people and profits. Harsh started his organic farm in 2011, building on the principles of sustainability and self-sufficiency. He and his team worked hard to amalgamate the best of traditional Indian farming with a modern outlook to social relations.

Harsh spent a good part of his childhood in villages, making regular trips to his grandmother’s small farm in Uttar Pradesh. As a child he admits he was not thrilled to leave the city for the remoteness and simplicity of farm life. Now, he looks back at his learning: back then, occupations and products were organic in a lot of different ways, and he learned lessons from what was best in the villages, especially the way they treated the soil.

Harsh’s sympathies for the farming community impacted by farmers’ suicide in India is rooted in his deep bond with village life. When Harsh began to farm himself, alleviating social injustice truly became part of his practice. The farm is intentionally small, just under 6 acres. Majority farmers in India work on this amount of land or less. Also, being someone who holds health in high regard, traditional methods of farming seemed to fit his vision.

To truly eat organic, he believes it’s important to look past aesthetically perfect food and to think holistically about what is truly sustainable. This means not only buying organic, but also making a serious effort to eat locally. Likewise, he believes the current system from the farmer’s perspective, which is obsessed with productivity, is wrong and self-defeating. Instead of doing everything to maximize productivity, we need to measure the health of the soil, of plants, of animals, and the health of society. Harsh has put much of his time and effort into animal husbandry to find cows that represent India’s heritage, varieties that are indigenous but under threat from increasingly careless breeding.

The people who work the land at the farm are as important as the food it produces, and Harsh has worked hard to build a farm that takes the best from villages. He strongly believes in moving beyond social, religious and caste divisions that are deeply ingrained in the rural society. We found Harsh’s talk highly enlightening and insightful.

Written by Enakshi Borse

ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant
ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant
ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant
ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant
ARTIST & CORE FACULTY
Sharmila Samant
Sharmila-Samant-July-2017

  

Sharmila Samant works across multiple domains in her installation art practice. Interested in engaging people from non-artistic backgrounds, she started Open Circle to make the experience of art more welcoming in varied spaces. Open Circle ran for about 10 years with students, activists, sociologists, cultural practitioners and environmentalists collaborating on various media and showcasing art in railway stations, bastis and other non-conventional spaces.

Sharmila took us through her installation work titled ‘Loca Cola’ which was a collection of Coke bottles from various cities across the globe filled with the local drinks of that region. Sharmila researched the recipes of local drinks and especially mixed the concoctions for her installation. On another layer she added soundscapes of beaches, markets, schools and residential colonies to experience the nostalgic memories of places where the local drinks were sold in Mumbai.

Sharmila collected loads of Cola bottle caps – that came with the Coke bottles –  and there were enough to make a sari. Her first design was derived from the colors and pattern of a Tangail saree. Eventually Sharmila made different versions of the saree which she categorized as factory-made, made-to-order and handmade saree. Since the tapestry of caps was a flexible structure, she pushed the limits of the saree to mimic fabric. She made rotatable cylindrical installations, a series fabricated for Mumbai International Airport’s artwork programme.

Handpicked Rejects was a 2003 installation where Sharmila collected factory rejected clothing from ex-workers of a sweatshop in Dharavi cloth production for famous global brands. Defects in every piece of clothing were patched with embroidery like Zardozi with a line that said ‘This is an original’. The clothes were exhibited as if in a shop; visitors could actually try on the clothes and buy them. The exhibit space was immersed in the soundscape of Bombay market streets.

Sharmila actively works with ‘Ghar Banao, Ghar Bachao Aandolan’ which was started by National Alliance of People’s Movement and is closely associated with the Narmada Bachao Aandolan. Open Circle organized multiple workshops where people from various stratas of society came together to participate. Through street photography workshops and collaborations with illustrators they created graphic comics addressing the slum demolition issues in Mumbai. Open Circle worked with NGOs such as Pratham and Sathi to carry out these activities. In 2005, Open Circle helped the people protesting in Azad Maidan against slum demolitions being carried out in Mumbai, providing temporary cover and boosting their morale by organizing community activities.

Besides the numerous installation and exhibitions that Sharmila shared with us, her interest also lies in pedagogy. Sharmila, along with her husband, moved from Mumbai to Delhi to start the MFA program at Shiv Nadar Art School. Their company Art First addresses teaching of art in schools focussed on nurturing creative ways of thinking.

Written by Sarah Kaushik

EDITOR
Omair Ahmad
EDITOR
Omair Ahmad
EDITOR
Omair Ahmad
EDITOR
Omair Ahmad
EDITOR
Omair Ahmad
Omair-Ahmad-July-2017

  

A passionate speaker, Omair Ahmad spoke about his journey as an editor and writer. He is South Asia editor for The Third Pole, which reports on water issues in the Himalayan region, principally focussing on the river basins of the Indus, Ganga and Brahmaputra. Concurrently, he is the Books Editor at The Wire. He authored The Storyteller’s Tale, a novella set in 18th Century India; Jimmy the Terrorist is a novel set in a small town in contemporary UP and The Kingdom at the Centre of the World traces a political history of Bhutan and the eastern Himalayan region.

The Third Pole – Understanding Asia’s Water Crisis has their focus is on the biggest glacial waters: after the North & the South pole, billions of people living in this part of Asia are dependent on the river basin and many of them are related to agriculture. Reporters of the South Asian newsletter are in different countries of this region i.e. India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Nepal and Afghanistan. Omair spoke about the ever growing expansion of urban population and issues arising with it. Loss of wetlands is one of the major issues; unplanned expansions are making cities insufficient to handle the demands of the human population. Cities big and small grow by eating their water bodies and unfortunately most cities in India are expanding in this manner. Bad design is much to blame, which makes city infrastructure fragile and prone to natural disasters.

Omair shared his journey about writing the political history of Bhutan in the eastern Himalayan region. Due to its geographical location, Bhutan, a little country between India and China, has areas which have disputed border lines. Interestingly Omair noted that conflicts are found in border states across all post colonial countries. He spoke extensively about the history of Bhutan, the tea trade and wars associated with it. He told us an interesting anecdote about how the word ‘teetotaler’ was coined related to tea and its history in Europe; tea became a beverage of class and the church in Britain promoted this beverage to its citizens to reduce alcoholism. Tea was also a beverage of war, as the British fought a war with Bhutan which turned out to be very expensive for the Britishers. Bhutan fought back equally well. The Brits were worried they would would burn the tea plantations and hence agreed to pay rent to the Bhutanese, which was a rare event in the colonial era. This book was an endless search to find the truth by unfolding layers of stories. One of the lessons he learnt was that when you approach a project, it is important to realize your limitations.

Omair, who has been passionate about writing books since he was a teenager made an insightful observation: most books are about kings but rarely about the city and common people. Unfortunately, common people were rarely documented, but it would be fascinating to read the history from the eyes of a everyday person. Omair ended the talk with the beautiful poem ‘Ithaka’ by C. P. Cavafy.

Written by Ankita Singh

ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen
ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen
ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen
ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen
ARCHITECT
Rahul Sen
Rahul-Sen-July-2017

 

Rahul Sen is the owner and Principal architect at Sensen Designs. After graduating from CEPT, Ahmedabad in 2000 with a Bachelor of Architecture degree, he began his own practice in 2003. Sen’s presentation at the forum gave us an overview of his achievements over the past years. His designs are conceived from thorough research which contributes to his sense of purposeful building. Critical questions are answered after insightful research rather than arriving at solutions by basic deduction. Rahul does not approach his projects with a predetermined aesthetic or a signature style in mind. His designs evolve from a rigorous inquiry into the particulars of location and program.

He believes that architecture is a response to fundamental human needs & a way of organizing space while meeting practical demands. Architecture is also deeply responsive to material, appropriate constructions methods, the cultural, historical and physical environment. One of Sen’s projects, a Mountain Villa at Uttarakhand showed us more clearly what he meant by him not following a signature style of architecture. He built the villa using a combination of concrete frame structure, stone masonry brick surfaces and timber roof structures. The ceilings inside are high to keep the house cool and also give it a spacious feeling. The house had one large roof that sheltered the entire structure. The result was a cozy villa where you can imagine spending a enjoyable week, knit a sweater or two, read a nice book, have some brandy in front of the fireplace, share stories of the past with friends and smoke a pipe. The perfect life!

Written by Agnisesh Setlur

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl
SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl
SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl
SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGNER
Amardeep Behl
SCENOGRAPHER &
EXHIBITION DESIGNER


Amardeep Behl
Amardeep-Behl-July-2017

  

Amar, as he is better known in the design fraternity, spoke at length of how he despised museums as a child. These early impressions influenced him deeply and today, his practice strives to improve the “experience” within museum spaces. His interest in spaces inspired him to first join an architectural course in Ahmedabad, but he shifted to NID to pursue design: the field opened up many avenues towards his inquiry into aspects of designing spaces.

Amar, as he is better known in the design fraternity, spoke at length of how he despised museums as a child. These early impressions influenced him deeply and today, his practice strives to improve the “experience” within museum spaces. His interest in spaces inspired him to first join an architectural course in Ahmedabad, but he shifted to NID to pursue design: the field opened up many avenues towards his inquiry into aspects of designing spaces.

Amar and his team at designhabit work towards re-imagining museum experiences as more immersive and narrative environments, breaking the preconceived notions of glass box, “Do not Touch” attitude of existing museums.

At the Forum, he shared images of projects like DS Group Corporate Museum, Sadhu Vaswani Mission Museum and Virasat-e-Khalsa. Having experienced the immersive environments at Virasat-e-Khalsa in person, our group at Lopez Design were better positioned to connect with Amar’s intent of narrative environments and storytelling. The use of technology, animatrix, kinetics and dynamic lighting appear to feature frequently in his practice. These also help in creating dynamic displays and position the displays technologically at par with world museums.

Amar emphasized how the role of a museum designer is often an afterthought when a museum project is conceived in India. This concern was discussed after the talk, where Amar insisted that a museum designer should collaborate with project architects and drive the project together for a more cohesive design solution. In an ideal situation the museum designer should be the principal decision maker and other stakeholders like architects and infrastructure operations should work under their directions.

Written by Surajit Ranjan Das

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha
CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha
CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha
CONTEMPORARY ARTIST & INSTALLATIONS
Tanmoy Samantha
CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
& INSTALLATIONS


Tanmoy Samantha
Tanmoy-Samanta-July-2017

  

The last speaker of our July forum, Tanmoy Samantha presented many projects that he has covered over the past two years. An independent artist based in New Delhi, Tanmoy studied Fine Arts and did his Graduation and masters at Shantiniketan. Later, he taught at The Krishnamurthy Residential school for four years; after which, he moved to Delhi to take up art full time. His works include paintings on rice paper and extensions of the technique on books – he adds other objects to rice paper and excavates forms from it. His installations of these art explorations can be found in Hyatt Chennai, Ahmedabad and the Mumbai Airport.

Tanmoy’s works reflect his learnings from Company paintings, art that came out from Dadaism and Bauhaus and also Indian Miniature paintings. He is fascinated by the latter as they portray interior and exterior spaces coexisting without creating any illusions, purely two dimensional and graphical.

Tanmoy briefly spoke about the medium of his art, influences and his interests. In the technique that he uses for his artworks, he applies rice paper over a thicker paper and keeps layering with watery thin water-based pigments. The wrinkles and lines that form as a result of attaching the rice papers become part of the textures he incorporates in his art. The transparency of the rice paper reveals marks and stains, which to him appear like a sedimented scroll of fabric. Tanmoy explained how the process is similar to the tempera technique as it bears the traces of past layers.

Further, he spoke about the images for his artworks which he derives from mundane surroundings; through his process they transgress into ambiguous objects of inquiry.

Tanmoy compares his process to sculpting and talked about the dense interplay of the known and unknown, the real and the imagined that come together as a cohesive force through his artworks. His works complement and contradict and are at constant play be it between volume and void or positive and negative spaces.

Over the span of two years, Tanmoy has adapted his technique from being individual pieces, to series and extensions, then into objects and installations which truly highlight his experience and knowledge of the medium.

Written by Niyati Rao

EMAIL

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ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday



STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday