Forum No.18
5th Aug 2017

Forum No.18
5th Aug 2017

Forum No.18
5th Aug 2017

Forum No.18
5th Aug 2017

Forum No.18
5th Aug 2017

COLLABORATION | MAKES HEISENBERGS

COLLABORATION | MAKES HEISENBERGS

COLLABORATION | MAKES HEISENBERGS

COLLABORATION | MAKES HEISENBERGS

COLLABORATION | MAKES HEISENBERGS

Forum_15

CURATOR, EARTH & GRASS WORKSHOP
Minhazz Majumdar

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das

ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi

ARTIST
Parul Gupta

CURATOR, EARTH & GRASS WORKSHOP
Minhazz Majumdar

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das

ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi

ARTIST
Parul Gupta

CURATOR, EARTH & GRASS WORKSHOP
Minhazz Majumdar

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das

ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi

ARTIST
Parul Gupta

CURATOR, EARTH & GRASS WORKSHOP
Minhazz Majumdar

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das

ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi

ARTIST
Parul Gupta

CURATOR, EARTH & GRASS WORKSHOP
Minhazz Majumdar

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das

ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi

ARTIST
Parul Gupta

GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari

ANTHROPOLOGIST

Sarover Zaidi

PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun

GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari

ANTHROPOLOGIST

Sarover Zaidi

PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun

GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari

ANTHROPOLOGIST

Sarover Zaidi

PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun

GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari

ANTHROPOLOGIST

Sarover Zaidi

PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun

GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari

ANTHROPOLOGIST

Sarover Zaidi

PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun

CURATOR
Minhazz Majumdar
CURATOR
Minhazz Majumdar
CURATOR
Minhazz Majumdar
CURATOR
Minhazz Majumdar
CURATOR
Minhazz Majumdar
Minhazz-Majumdar-Aug-2017

 

A maverick by her own description, Minhaaz Majumdar is an independent art curator, designer and educator with extensive first-hand knowledge of the diverse cultures and arts of contemporary India. She has years of experience working cross-culturally, both nationally and internationally and has been organizer of several successful international arts programs. Over the years, she has built several cutting edge collections of arts and crafts from India for institutions worldwide and is a curator for many museums around the world. Minhaaz has been working with collections of bamboo and textiles from the North East for the last 20 years. She is also an educator, teaching at the National Museum and NID.

Minhaaz’s presentation was on Collecting India, building collections from different parts of the country. India as a subject is vast and there are is a plethora of topics, which makes choosing any one difficult. Work culture in the West is a linear structure, where things are planned way in advance. Whereas in India it is not so, which at times is a huge challenge.

In the recent past Minhaaz was involved in three major projects in the UK and Australia, which she talked about in detail sharing her experiences and the ups and down of her journeys. Many times the work begins with an existing collection and at times there are gaps to be filled which is complementary to the theme – some of the art pieces are eclectic in nature. Collecting contemporary Indian artefacts helps fill in the gap and caters to the museum’s diverse audience. It is imperative the content in the museum attracts audience to spend more time.

Documentation is a crucial part of curating any museum collection, in which there are logistical issues such as crediting artists correctly and maintaining the paperwork. It is important to also create the context and assist the audience to understand the pieces on display. While working for the Glasgow show the local diaspora was considered to build the collection; artefacts were collected from Assam, West Bengal and Punjab. Minhaaz is an excellent speaker, full of life and energy and we were all delighted to get a glimpse into her world.

Written by Ankita Singh

 

A maverick by her own description, Minhaaz Majumdar is an independent art curator, designer and educator with extensive first-hand knowledge of the diverse cultures and arts of contemporary India. She has years of experience working cross-culturally, both nationally and internationally and has been organizer of several successful international arts programs. Over the years, she has built several cutting edge collections of arts and crafts from India for institutions worldwide and is a curator for many museums around the world. Minhaaz has been working with collections of bamboo and textiles from the North East for the last 20 years. She is also an educator, teaching at the National Museum and NID.

Minhaaz’s presentation was on Collecting India, building collections from different parts of the country. India as a subject is vast and there are is a plethora of topics, which makes choosing any one difficult. Work culture in the West is a linear structure, where things are planned way in advance. Whereas in India it is not so, which at times is a huge challenge.

In the recent past Minhaaz was involved in three major projects in the UK and Australia, which she talked about in detail sharing her experiences and the ups and down of her journeys. Many times the work begins with an existing collection and at times there are gaps to be filled which is complementary to the theme – some of the art pieces are eclectic in nature. Collecting contemporary Indian artefacts helps fill in the gap and caters to the museum’s diverse audience. It is imperative the content in the museum attracts audience to spend more time.

Documentation is a crucial part of curating any museum collection, in which there are logistical issues such as crediting artists correctly and maintaining the paperwork. It is important to also create the context and assist the audience to understand the pieces on display. While working for the Glasgow show the local diaspora was considered to build the collection; artefacts were collected from Assam, West Bengal and Punjab. Minhaaz is an excellent speaker, full of life and energy and we were all delighted to get a glimpse into her world.

Written by Ankita Singh

SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das
SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das
SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das
SCENOGRAPHER & EXHIBITION DESIGN
Siddhartha Das
SCENOGRAPHER &
EXHIBITION DESIGN


Siddhartha Das
Siddhartha-Das-Aug-2017

 

An exhibition designer, Siddhartha Das began his own studio where he has been practicing for many years. His presentation, which started with an introduction to his background was peppered with comical stories of how it all began. After having taught in schools across cities and in rural areas of Ladakh and Rajasthan, Siddhartha’s interest in the craft communities grew immensely. While being involved in this sector, he wanted to create meaning in whatever work he did and create an impact. In design, he found a means to achieve this end.

At his 15-year old studio Das practices a range of works from the realms of art, craft, design and culture. The first project he introduced to us was ‘The Painted Pleasures’ at Jal Mahal, a pleasure pavilion built by the former king of Jaipur. Artists were commissioned to paint directly on the walls of Jal Mahal in the authentic traditional painting styles, while contemporizing the composition and the content for today’s audience. In the monument, multiple crafts and materials were applied to achieve an aesthetic design of the spaces.

Das’s most recent project is close to his heart and represents the kind of work he would like to do in the future – he was involved in the design of a 19-year old museum building with multiple tech tools to create an environment that engages the visitors to experience education differently. Another project in the pipeline for Siddhartha is in the hot and arid Jodhpur, for a 90-year old museum building set on a large plot of land with gardens. Aside of the musuem project, Das’s studio has plans for the landscape to plant indigenous, flowering and fruit bearing trees and build an interactive playground for children.

Siddhartha also gave us a glimpse into the exhibitions designed by him in Zurich and London. He spoke about the interesting perspectives which were brought to the table from the exhibition ‘Encounters’ which looked at Asia and Europe. In particular, Siddhartha spoke about a memorable exhibition of Khadi in 2001 where he worked with Mapu Martand Singh. Another interesting project that Siddhartha described was at the College of Design. The building has an area of 60,000 sq ft in Okhla, Delhi and a peculiar history – it was once a textile factory, then a bank and has now been converted to a design school.

Siddhartha’s insights on dealing with different kinds of clients and convincing them of better design solutions were intriguing. The fascinating range of work that he brought to to share at the Forum showed us Siddhartha’s varied interests – it was a great delight for the audience.

Written by Sarah Kaushik

ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi
ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi
ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi
ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi
ARCHITECT • VIADESIGN
Ram Joshi
Ram-Joshi-Aug-2017

 

Ram Joshi, better known to us as a musician in Indian Ocean and a cartoonist at The Statesman, is also the founder of Via Design, an interior design consultancy firm. Ram spoke about design as an act of problem solving through examples of projects they have been involved with since 1998.

Via Design has primarily worked on corporate interiors for PwC, Adidas, Microsoft to name a few. Ram shared a few simple design decisions which have worked well for them in terms of solving a problem in their respective projects. He also presented interesting explorations that showed how they have used various materials to create screens and other such interior elements in their projects.

Written by Surajit Das

ARTIST
Parul Gupta
ARTIST
Parul Gupta
ARTIST
Parul Gupta
ARTIST
Parul Gupta
ARTIST
Parul Gupta
Parul-Gupta-Aug-2017

 

 

 

 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari
GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari
GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari
GRAPHIC DESIGNER & MOTION GRAPHICS
Sourav Brahmachari
GRAPHIC DESIGNER &
MOTION GRAPHICS


Sourav Brahmachari
Sourav-Brahmachari-Aug-2017

 

Sourav Brahmachari, our fifth presenter at the August forum. While he studied Graphic Design from Srishti School of Art and Design, Sourav has worked across various design fields. His journey across these various fields over seven years in the industry made for an interesting story.

Sourav’s presentation began with a showreel showcasing his Motion Graphics skills, for which some of us simply broke out in applause. A need to create for a fast-consuming, younger audience defines his style of work. Having worked for channels like Discovery and Nat Geo, he had good exposure in the area of motion graphics. Despite his deep love for Motion Graphics, Sourav’s is drawn most to working with craftsman and traditional artists. He took us through a variety of such projects that have interested him, which can be seen at the Mumbai Airport and India Habitat Centre. From working on installations constructed of clay and cork to doing scenography for the Indian Habitat Centre, Sourav impressed us with his range. He believes in pursuing a variety of projects, and doesn’t want to get sucked into one kind of job. His dreams for the future are to integrate the business of space design with projection mapping and bring in his videography skills. He also recently started his own company called ‘Cheetah Fight Productions’. He ended the talk with showing us a few more of his motion graphics clips built around politics and a trailer for an upcoming DIY show – these can be found on his Instagram channel.

Written by Joash Youtham

ANTHROPOLOGIST
Sarover Zaidi
ANTHROPOLOGIST
Sarover Zaidi
ANTHROPOLOGIST
Sarover Zaidi
ANTHROPOLOGIST
Sarover Zaidi
Sarover-Zaidi-Aug-2017

 

Sarover Zaidi is an anthropologist who works on architecture/ material culture. Her early works include exploring religious architecture like churches, synagogues and mosques in the old city of Bombay. Dongri, Bhindi bazaar, Mohammed Ali road was her core study area. She spent about two years walking around these streets. Here she studied about 5 synagogues, 4 churches and 70 different styles of Mosque architecture. As she spent more time in those communities her area of study shifted towards iconography in Islam. She majorly studied communities related to the Islamic context and concentrated on the long-lived debate on whether Islam should perform idol/ image based worship or not.

The area that Sarover studied had several different denominations of Muslims. Personas ranging from the hard-core Saudi Muslim culture follow who wouldn’t even bury his people as the grave itself can become an idol to the lady who performed prayer rituals treating the hand of Fatima as an idol.

What is allowed and not allowed in Islam in the context of idol is confusing space. The words “image” and “idol” are used interchangeably throughout the Zaidi’s study. The research was further narrowed down into the Shia community who consider themselves as minorities in the larger Islamic context. The Shia’s have developed a different way of practice during their ritual mourning period of Muharram. During her journey she tripped in the whole question of “Why is there such a lot of idol worship?”

Sarover maps the terrain of her work before taking us through the final findings. These include images of architecture with text in Urdu overlaid on the images, products manufactured in China with the evident influence of Chinese calligraphy in Urdu texts, images of Ali placed in Shia shrines within clock towers, images where the face of Ali has been wiped out but the name remains. The terrain was a melange of spaces, cultures, dialects and the perceptions of its people.

She mentions that there is a lot of shifting and borrowing of motifs (both ritual motifs and designed motifs) between Hinduism and Islam. When it came to the image of God, artists constantly explored posters and artwork with and without the face of Gods. There is also a theory where people tend to believe in a phenomenon where the face of God is not created by human hands and rather left behind by the God himself. Such images are generally hand and foot prints.

Another icon which Zaidi studied intensively is the Hand of Fatima or The Panja Aalam. This Hand represents the family of the Prophet, it also represents luck and it is considered an Islamic idol. It is one of the most ubiquitous forms available in the Shia context. This form has spilled over into Sunnis and Sufi shrines; it has the power of spilling into contexts which it was not supposed to be a part of. The celebration of Muharram on a large scale was inspired from how Ganesh Chaturthi was celebrated in Bombay. The Hand of Fatima is also called Hamsa, Khamsa or Panja. The form of the Hand tends to morph itself and localise from state to state. According to Zaidi’s study, overtime the form and details on the Hand have modernised as well.

The acquisitions on the Shias was that they perform idol worship. Sarover interviewed several people including theologists and asked them why is idol worship still prevalent, but the response would always try to hide the same. Soon she moved on interviews with artisans who created the Hand. An artisan cannot deny that he’s making an idol and they often spoke about how their skill is present due to “barkhat” or blessing which runs in their family. It was interesting to see how the artisan was navigating the plane of dealing with material objects.

Written by Shivani Prakash

PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun
PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun
PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun
PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun
PERFORMANCE ARTIST & ACTIVIST
Manmeet Devgun
Manmeet-Devgun-Aug-2017

 

Manmeet Devgun is a performance and lens-based artist from Chandigarh, now working in Delhi. Manmeet has done various projects and performances in India and other countries. Her work as a performance artist is closely linked to her own concerns and life-situations, often foregrounding key feminist concerns. As a photographer she engages primarily with her personal space, specifically of sexuality, desire, the relationship with objects and her ever-changing relationship with her daughter as a single mother. As an artist there is a constant urge to create, however as a single mother there are many challenges and hence, her priorities in life have changed. Her performance on ‘stuck in a situation’ was one such example where the course of the performance would change based on the situation at hand, when she had to immediately attend to her daughter. She has also collaborated with her daughter as in her installation, ‘Mera Ghar’ which portrays the mother-daughter relationship.

Manmeet addresses many social issues of society, evoking satire and varying shades of humour. As a photographer she uses different media to play with the subject matter. Mocking the Indian matrimony industry with photo collages of herself was an excellent representation of how women are objectified as marriage material. Art works as therapy for her. In numerous series of works, she uses self-portraiture to unleash the artist inside her. Manmeet’s ‘The Honour Cloud’ is a thought provoking performance on the subject of family honour. In this live act she tied a huge turban with the text ‘you are the honour of the family’ written in English, Hindi and Punjabi. The audience was asked to wear the turban and feel the weight.

Manmeet is also an art teacher in a school where she works with children exploring different media, introducing them to new ways of learning with art and objects. Her presentation was very powerful, bold and brave, stimulating the audience to think about social issues of the society and how it impacts us as individuals.

Written by Ankita Singh

EMAIL

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mail us at info@lopezdesign.com

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ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday



STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday