Forum No.19
2nd Sept 2017

Forum No.19
2nd Sept 2017

Forum No.19
2nd Sept 2017

Forum No.19
2nd Sept 2017

Forum No.19
2nd Sept 2017

COLLABORATION | IS MUSIC TO OUR EARS

COLLABORATION | IS MUSIC TO OUR EARS

COLLABORATION | IS MUSIC TO OUR EARS

COLLABORATION | IS MUSIC TO OUR EARS

COLLABORATION | IS MUSIC TO OUR EARS

Forum_16

DANCER & CURATOR
Navina Jafa

SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul

CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat

DANCER & CURATOR
Navina Jafa

SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul

CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat

DANCER & CURATOR
Navina Jafa

SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul

CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat

DANCER & CURATOR
Navina Jafa

SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul

CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat

DANCER & CURATOR
Navina Jafa

SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul

CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat

MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das

PASTRY CHEF

Jeneva Talwar

ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz

MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das

PASTRY CHEF

Jeneva Talwar

ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz

MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das

PASTRY CHEF

Jeneva Talwar

ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz

MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das

PASTRY CHEF

Jeneva Talwar

ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz

MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das

PASTRY CHEF

Jeneva Talwar

ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz

Navina-Jafa-Sept-2017

 

Navina Jafa, a Fulbright Scholar at the Smithsonian, entered the world of creativity as a dancer. In 2011, she wrote a book called ‘Performing Heritage: The Art of Exhibit Walks’ post her experience at the Smithsonian. At the Forum, Navina began her presentation by explaining how she had conceived the application of design to map the body and its movements. The idea of performing took her into the domain of interpreting and presenting heritage through the medium of a self-coined term ‘academic tours’. The tours consist of two programs, City Walks and Journeys in Secret India. Navina began these programs after observing the plethora of ill-informed guides who were presenting Indian heritage to tourists.

A woman of multiple interests and a huge knowledge bank in sociology, art history, archeology, dance, Sanskrit and Persian language, Navina further did a PHD in Urban History and mapped the intangible/living heritage in North India. This research took her to the heart of India and allowed her to dwell in its many layers, which later helped her to build the narratives for the academic tours. We understood that she had to be constantly interactive at the grassroots level in order to tap into these ‘layers’ and building long-term relationships in order to sustain these experiences. Navina conveyed the importance of having an understanding for business even for an artist to be able to sustain an independent practice and its challenges.

Written by Sarah Kaushik

 

Navina Jafa, a Fulbright Scholar at the Smithsonian, entered the world of creativity as a dancer. In 2011, she wrote a book called ‘Performing Heritage: The Art of Exhibit Walks’ post her experience at the Smithsonian. At the Forum, Navina began her presentation by explaining how she had conceived the application of design to map the body and its movements. The idea of performing took her into the domain of interpreting and presenting heritage through the medium of a self-coined term ‘academic tours’. The tours consist of two programs, City Walks and Journeys in Secret India. Navina began these programs after observing the plethora of ill-informed guides who were presenting Indian heritage to tourists.

A woman of multiple interests and a huge knowledge bank in sociology, art history, archeology, dance, Sanskrit and Persian language, Navina further did a PHD in Urban History and mapped the intangible/living heritage in North India. This research took her to the heart of India and allowed her to dwell in its many layers, which later helped her to build the narratives for the academic tours. We understood that she had to be constantly interactive at the grassroots level in order to tap into these ‘layers’ and building long-term relationships in order to sustain these experiences. Navina conveyed the importance of having an understanding for business even for an artist to be able to sustain an independent practice and its challenges.

Written by Sarah Kaushik

SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul
SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul
SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul
SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST
Revati Laul
SENIOR INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST

Revati Laul
Revati-Laul-Sept-2017

 


 

CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat
CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat
CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat
CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat
CONSERVATION ARCHITECT
Neeraj Bhagat
Neeraj-Bhagat-Sept-2017

 

Neeraj Bhagat is an architect with a special interest in historical architecture. He was fascinated by architecture as it is a fine combination of the arts and sciences. After seven years in the school of planning and architecture, he graduated in 2002. The first major project he took up along with a few of his batchmates was a guest house design in Majnu ka tila – a Tibetan colony in Delhi. During the course of this project, the team was approached by a client who wanted them to design a monastery in Bodhgaya. The project took 2 years of hard work to complete but the end result was well received. This led Neeraj to understand the significance of buildings and monuments as cultural identities. Although building monasteries was a good experience, he realised that there was no creativity involved as there was not much they could change as they were required to follow a traditional format.

As Neeraj was pondering his next step, the answer came to him on a road trip to Orchha, Madhya Pradesh. As a young architect, he had been inspired by the ruins of the old palaces there. He came back to Delhi knowing that he wanted to be involved in projects related to historical buildings and conservation. Neeraj took up small projects to raise the money to go to UK to study. He lived in Edinburgh and learned how architecture could be presented, interpreted and showcased to an audience. He then worked for the Welsh government by helping them to design visitor centers. The constraint was that the design should not disturb the overall character of the place. The job allowed Neeraj to visit all the monuments in the surrounds, which was an enriching experience.

Due to the recession in the UK, he had to come back to India in 2011. He set up his own practice called Section CC’ which stands for Constructive Conservation indicative of an approach whereby one can incorporate contemporary elements to historic architecture. Since it was a start up, he took up a several freelance projects and also worked in Ladakh for a while. His work got the attention of Gurmeet Rai a renowned conservation architect from India, who gave him the opportunity to work in Orchha. That was where it had all began for him and Neeraj had come full circle.

Written by Agnisesh Setlur

MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das
MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das
MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das
MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das
MUSICIAN & DESIGNER
Rahul Das
Rahul-Das-Sept-2017

 

Rahul, a self taught musician and a trained automobile designer, now works as a freelance design consultant. He spoke about the link between his designs now feeding into the visual media, which represents his music practice.

Rahul shared some graphical visuals that he has created which have taken a form of the identity of his newly released music album – “TORA”. He explained how his ability to play different roles to create music compositions, practice as a visual artist to create album covers and make music videos for his own compositions – all his skills compliments one another. Rahul also spoke to us about the spatial installation designs he worked on as a freelance designer, which are now permanent features of many corporate office interiors.

Written by Surajit Ranjan Das

PASTRY CHEF
Jeneva Talwar
PASTRY CHEF
Jeneva Talwar
PASTRY CHEF
Jeneva Talwar
PASTRY CHEF
Jeneva Talwar
Jeneva-Talwar-Sept-2017

 

Jeneva Talwar is today the brand chef at The Artful Baker, a patisserie and boulangerie with its flagship store in Khan market and 4 other outlets in the city of Delhi. Jeneva took us through her interesting life journey from theatre to films and Bollywood to ENSP in France reliving her days in a highly male-dominated kitchen. Her talk was full of humour and puns, we enjoyed her stories. Her courage and willpower is admirable.

A History Honors student from St. Stephens’ College, Jeneva dabbled in theatre in Delhi working with Feizal Alkazi and Roysten Abel before going to National Institute of Design NID in Ahmedabad to study Film Direction. She assisted filmmaker Mike Pandey in wildlife documentaries as well as Shoojit Sarkar and Navdeep Singh in both advertising and feature films. A film on Polio, a short fiction film and a documentary called Still Standing: Lesser Known Monuments of Delhi are her other achievements. As an actor she worked in films that include The Guru, Slumdog Millionaire, Nagesh Kukunoor’s Bombay to Bangkok, Shaurya, Turning Thirty and Patiala House.

Jeneva went on to train in French pastry at Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Patisserie (ENSP) in France run by the legendary Alain Ducasse. She continued to work in France with established pastry icons like Patisserie David in Lyon and Maison Pillet in Bordeaux. Back in India, she worked as chef at the ITC Maurya, Delhi and helped set up Patisserie Delicieux in Goa. LaDiDa, the boutique catering company she started, specializes in exclusive French desserts. LaDiDa has worked with many restaurants and fashion brands including Paul Smith, Jimmy Choo, Makemytrip and Hungry Monkey.

Written by Ankita Singh

ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz
ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz
ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz
ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz
ANTHROPOLOGIST
Katie Laz
Katie-Laz-Sept-2017

 

Katie Lazarowicz, an American anthropologist was our sixth and final speaker for the September forum. A scholar at the University of Texas, Austin, Katie is currently doing research for her dissertation in India. Snippets from her study, which revolves around Madhubani art, made up the body of her talk. Katie’s first exposure to Madhubani Art happened when she visited her uncle, who was a missionary stationed in Bihar. Fascinated seeing a room full of girls practicing this art form, she was left with little doubt in her mind that she would like to research and write about Madhubani.

After a brief introduction about herself and her work, Katie sprung a question for the audience – ‘What does it mean for art to be fake?’ After our answers, she went on to describe her struggle to convince people that folk art is not ‘copy’ art and how it has a sense of value attached to it. When she attempted to promote Madhubani artists at art galleries, gallery directors would tell Katie – “Folk art is not original”. In her search to understand how to make a distinction, she arrived at James Clifford’s art culture system, which placed authenticity right at the top of a diamond diagram. Using this system, she understood what made Madhubani art authentic.

The second half of Katie’s talk began with her narrating an incident that took place in Pondicherry. She spotted a book that used Madhubani art to narrate a story for children. On finding out the name of the artist, she realized she knew him. Katie had always felt that this particular artist’s sister’s work was considerably better than his. In her opinion, his work was preferred over hers as the public seems to favor men. This prompted her to share a Marxist theory with the audience – ‘Once something made by a woman becomes valuable, men become interested in it and take over. It is only then that the market value rises up, and starts to appeal to others.’ To make her point, Katy shared several incidents where women are not given credit for their work.

It was interesting that Katie brought a great selection of books depicting the Madhubani art form, which she passed around for the audience to view, while she spoke about her research. These publications kept us all engaged, and many of us were left in awe looking at how stories were told using Madhubani paintings. Katie concluded her presentation with the story of the origins of Madhubani painting, 2500 years ago around the time of the Ramayana, at the wedding of Ram and Sita. Further, she invited our participation, asking for suggestions and thoughts on this topic, which would aid in her research in October.

Written by Joash Youtham

EMAIL

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ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday



STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday