Forum No.21
6th Jan 2018

Forum No.21
6th Jan 2018

Forum No.21
6th Jan 2018

Forum No.21
6th Jan 2018

Forum No.21
6th Jan 2018

COLLABORATION | IS FOR CENTURIES

COLLABORATION | IS FOR CENTURIES

COLLABORATION | IS FOR CENTURIES

COLLABORATION | IS FOR CENTURIES

Forum_18

COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan

CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh

MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Jasone Miranda Bilbao

PHOTOGRAPHER
Amit Pasricha

COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan

CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh

MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Jasone Miranda Bilbao

PHOTOGRAPHER
Amit Pasricha

COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan

CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh

MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Jasone Miranda Bilbao

PHOTOGRAPHER
Amit Pasricha

COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan

CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh

MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Jasone Miranda Bilbao

PHOTOGRAPHER
Amit Pasricha

COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan

CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh

MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Jasone Miranda Bilbao

PHOTOGRAPHER
Amit Pasricha

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Gigi Scaria

THEATRE DIRECTOR & LIGHTING DESIGNER
Zuleikha Chaudhari

THEATRE ARTIST
Mallika Taneja

FILM MAKER
Vijay Jodha

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Gigi Scaria

THEATRE DIRECTOR & LIGHTING DESIGNER
Zuleikha Chaudhari

THEATRE ARTIST
Mallika Taneja

FILM MAKER
Vijay Jodha

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Gigi Scaria

THEATRE DIRECTOR & LIGHTING DESIGNER
Zuleikha Chaudhari

THEATRE ARTIST
Mallika Taneja

FILM MAKER
Vijay Jodha

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Gigi Scaria

THEATRE DIRECTOR & LIGHTING DESIGNER
Zuleikha Chaudhari

THEATRE ARTIST
Mallika Taneja

FILM MAKER
Vijay Jodha

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Gigi Scaria

THEATRE DIRECTOR & LIGHTING DESIGNER
Zuleikha Chaudhari

THEATRE ARTIST
Mallika Taneja

FILM MAKER
Vijay Jodha

COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan
COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan
COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan
COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan
COMMUNICATION DESIGNER
Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan
01-Suchitra-Balasubrahmanyan-Jan-2018

  

Suchitra Balasubrahmanyan has been involved in the field of social communication for the past 25 years through her work in rural western India and urban slums. She is a historian of design and currently teaches at the Ambedkar University.

Suchitra brought up the interesting backstory to the Nimbu-mirchi, a social practice followed in India. The Nimbu-Mirchi (A lemon and bunch of chillies) are often hung outside homes, shops and on automobiles. The Nimbu-mirchi acts as a talisman against injury and misfortune. Suchitra went on to speak about the history behind this tradition, She explains that the Goddess of misfortune – ‘Alakshmi’ is fond of sour and spicy food and the Nimbu-mirchi is meant to be an offering. It is believed that the offering appeases the goddess and protects the asset- whether a business or vehicle, from her wrath.

Suchitra went on to expose the extractive nature of design in today’s world, where a market has been created of social practices. Various images of wooden and metal nimbu-mirchi hangings were shown, currently available for purchase online. The inorganic nature of these new age products would technically fail to complete their original purpose- appeasing Alakshmi. She defined design such as this as a ‘Predatory trend’ herein old knowledge is lost and so a complex practice is turned into a mere symbol.

Using this example Suchitra explained the ‘Two Cultures of Design’. Over time, design morphs and takes many new forms. Security and protection is now achieved using Locks instead of the Nimbu-Mirchi. In some cases, interestingly both are placed outside a shop. Suchitra’s talk lead to a passionate question-answer session. The audience debated the merits of such systems of protection, notions of security and superstition in India and the objectification of social practices.

Suchitra ended the discussing reiterating the importance of understanding the semantic bedrock behind any design practice. She continues her work in progress in building a framework to understand the two kinds of design practiced in India today.

Written by Madhavi Menon

CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh
CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh
CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh
CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh
CHIEF FINANCE OFFICER
Rahul Noble Singh
02-Rahul-Noble-Singh-Jan-2018

  

“I am not a designer. I am not an artist, I am a Chartered Accountant,” says Rahul Noble Singh. His talk proceeded to demonstrate how effective financial models bring the framework of a creative enterprise together. Growing up, Rahul’s family had a trucking business – his father is from Bihar and his mother from Scotland. Till the age of 12, he went back and forth with family between London and India every six months and he then completed his education from the UK. When he moved to Delhi 8 years ago, Rahul initially joined Fab India for two years. Their model was interesting: 100% of the product was supplied via the 17 companies under Fab India, whose artisans were also shareholders. Later, Fab India decided to disband this system, absorbing all the units into their enterprise. RangSutra, one of their suppliers in Rajasthan decided to go it alone, where Rahul now works.

A trade of cultures
Rahul sees a process of extraction in taking rich age-old crafts to make a cushion cover using traditional textile technique. Likewise, with cultures, there is a process of ‘extraction’ in picking up from the West and East, thereby bridging the gap between tradition and contemporary towards creating jobs and employment. Rahul, who had worked in the social sector for development before he became a CA, was interested in examining effective models for social change, which had a for-profit entrepreneurial and business flavour to them.

The RangSutra model
RangaSutra was begun 12 years back. 1000 artisans put down 1000 rupees each – that was the first 10 lakhs of equity in the business. Their main aim is to create regular and sustainable jobs working with highly skilled artisans to the global market. Says Rahul, “We mainly work with 3000 artisans, many from home, 70% being women.” 2200 of the artisans today are shareholders in Rangsutra, which aims to be a bridge between artisans and customers, tradition and contemporary, change and continuity. They provide support to artisans, which translate to quality control, sales, standardization and delivery for customers. By aggregating a large number of artisans, RangSutra is able to tap into large retail market. Points out Rahul, “A villager in Rajasthan will never be able to access a customer in Japan…” and vice versa. When Sumita Ghose started RangSutra in Rajasthan, she decided to enable the region’s natural lifestyle, where farmers pursued crafts as an alternative occupation. In order to scale up the business however, they needed other investors than the artisans, so she decided to start a Public Limited Company. Today, they do 12 crore of sales each year, Ikea and Fab India being their two main customers. They work mainly in Western Rajasthan, UP, Manipur and Kashmir and would like to replicate the model they have developed, across the country. Rangsutra has received funding from government organizations to work with groups in a particular cluster to become suppliers. They also train women with basic level skills to be crowd managers of 20 to 25 women in a group.

Creating their own label
Up until now RangSutra had concentrated on lower margins and higher volumes looking at greater employment. Now, they are looking at expanding their own label also creating high-end products looking to incorporate more skilled artisans as well as diversifying their range. RangSutra’s need for design is two-fold – generating ideas for products and the need to communicate their story, their product and culture. Developing a brand and communication strategy is a new concern for the firm – how to develop their Facebook page and social media, print, images, labels on their products and the interior of their store – everything that goes into making their brand. They look forward to this exciting journey. The audience comments included the thought that it was important to share this laudable model with others on a public platform so it is available to many to replicate or follow.

Written by Sujatha Shankar Kumar

MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario
MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario
MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario
MUSICIANS & DESIGNERS
Jim Isaac & Ashish Rozario
03-Jim-Isaac-Ashish-Rozario-Jan-2018

  

Jim and Ashish run Mustard Tree – a design firm based in New Delhi. Interestingly, design was never ‘first choice’ for them. Music is what they truly desired in their hearts. Their effort to balance music
& design thus formed the crux of their talk. When it came to picking a career, it was always ‘music vs design’ for J&A. Seeing a rising demand for design, the decision that seemed correct (design), was eventually taken. The love for music, however, never died. Ashish went onto explain how music helped him visualize graphics, which only enhanced his reputation as a designer. In the process followed by the creative industry, music always comes after the visuals are finalized.

Jim and Ashish, however, always benefited by putting audio first, before any form of visualization. The duo also spoke about how audio signatures play a part in building a brand identity, citing examples of tunes by Airtel, Nokia and Coke. The struggle to find such work in India is challenging, but it is the kind of work they strive to do in the future. Jim claimed that everyone, with or without any training in music, still had knowledge of the Pentatonic scale. A fun exercise was carried out soon after, proving his theory. The two ended their talk by showing the trailer of a web series titled – ‘Take 3’, which they also produced together. Jim joked about how this web series has opened the prospect of acting for him, as he hurried off to an audition soon after their talk.

Written by Joash Youtham

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Jasone Miranda Bilbao
CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Jasone Miranda Bilbao
CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Jasone Miranda Bilbao
04-Jasone-Miranda-Bilbao-Jan-2018

 

Jasone Miranda-Bilbao is a multidisciplinary artist. She works with sculpture, photography and video through which she explores questions surrounding the continuity of space and the relation between duration, materiality and affect, distance and slow-motion, flatness and dimensionality. She refers to her work as a mixture of activities. She has a PhD in Fine Art from the Goldsmiths College -University of London, an MA in History and Theory of Modern Art from Chelsea College of Art -London and a BA (HONS) Fine Art from Winchester School of Art – Winchester, UK. 

Jasone spends extended periods of time working while travelling. Through writing, she explores similar topics from a Deleuzian perspective using Nomadism and Meditation to emphasize the role of the observer, going from geography to anatomy and from the ‘house’ to the ‘body’ as point of reference. Her practice proposes a ‘model of being’ that aims at bypassing differences between thinking, working and living. Her work involves various media and in the last few years travel has become an integral part of her practice. She is regularly on the move and this nomadic lifestyle assists her art-making. The unfamiliarity of her surroundings give her a sense of distance and detachment that aligns with her arts practice as an individual. This way of relating to the world becomes a vital part of her work.

 

Jasone Miranda-Bilbao is a multidisciplinary artist. She works with sculpture, photography and video through which she explores questions surrounding the continuity of space and the relation between duration, materiality and affect, distance and slow-motion, flatness and dimensionality. She refers to her work as a mixture of activities. She has a PhD in Fine Art from the Goldsmiths College -University of London, an MA in History and Theory of Modern Art from Chelsea College of Art -London and a BA (HONS) Fine Art from Winchester School of Art – Winchester, UK.

Jasone spends extended periods of time working while travelling. Through writing, she explores similar topics from a Deleuzian perspective using Nomadism and Meditation to emphasize the role of the observer, going from geography to anatomy and from the ‘house’ to the ‘body’ as point of reference. Her practice proposes a ‘model of being’ that aims at bypassing differences between thinking, working and living. Her work involves various media and in the last few years travel has become an integral part of her practice. She is regularly on the move and this nomadic lifestyle assists her art-making. The unfamiliarity of her surroundings give her a sense of distance and detachment that aligns with her arts practice as an individual. This way of relating to the world becomes a vital part of her work.

Written by Jigyasa Thukral

PHOTOGRAPHER
Amit Pasricha
PHOTOGRAPHER
Amit Pasricha
PHOTOGRAPHER
Amit Pasricha
05-Amit-Pasricha-Jan-2018

  

Amit Pasricha was destined to pursue photography, coming from a creative family who more than dappled in the field. His grandfather did hand painted photographs of the Maharajas and the tradition was passed on to his father, who took up dance and music as his photographic specialty. Amit always had a keen eye and his love for photography started with the first panoramic picture he took in school. After this, he began calling himself a ‘Panoramist’. Amit believes that photography is about discovering points of view beyond one’s own.

He believes that everything we encounter is a jigsaw puzzle that needs to fit together. Usually in photography, the eye needs to come to a point. However, Amit believes that our vision has no boundaries and thus allows his photographs to establish different focus points, thus capturing many things in detail. The overall picture builds a story by stitching together parts of a sequence. With the huge scale of his photographs and the technique of panoramic digital photography, he has set a unique benchmark in his profession. He has held exhibitions and published numerous books and is now one of the foremost names in Panoramic Photography. In The Monumental India Book, Amit’s love for his homeland comes to fore; he photographed a series of India’s architectural gems and monuments. He has used natural elements cleverly to capture the drama and create impactful images. In 2008, this book was acclaimed as one of the top 10 coffee-table books of the world. He followed up with The sacred India book in 2010, in which he beautifully uses the technique of panorama to connect objects together. His photographs weave together the many aspects of Indian spirituality to present the complex spiritual scene for India for viewers. He continues to play with scale and detail, to explore larger than life expressions and transporting viewers into the location. Over a span of 8 years, Amit photographed Indians all over India in their domestic space. This study of the domestic scenarios of India culminated in India at home, released in 2016. From rural households to elegant palatial homes, Amit’s portrayals of 21st century homes are a bold and rich collection. This passionate photographer is now aiming at documenting the lesser-known India with his nuanced language.

Written by Riya Mahajan

  

Amit Pasricha was destined to pursue photography, coming from a creative family who more than dappled in the field. His grandfather did hand painted photographs of the Maharajas and the tradition was passed on to his father, who took up dance and music as his photographic specialty. Amit always had a keen eye and his love for photography started with the first panoramic picture he took in school. After this, he began calling himself a ‘Panoramist’. Amit believes that photography is about discovering points of view beyond one’s own. He believes that everything we encounter is a jigsaw puzzle that needs to fit together. Usually in photography, the eye needs to come to a point. However, Amit believes that our vision has no boundaries and thus allows his photographs to establish different focus points, thus capturing many things in detail. The overall picture builds a story by stitching together parts of a sequence. With the huge scale of his photographs and the technique of panoramic digital photography, he has set a unique benchmark in his profession.
He has held exhibitions and published numerous books and is now one of the foremost names in Panoramic Photography. In The Monumental India Book, Amit’s love for his homeland comes to fore; he photographed a series of India’s architectural gems and monuments. He has used natural elements cleverly to capture the drama and create impactful images. In 2008, this book was acclaimed as one of the top 10 coffee-table books of the world. He followed up with The sacred India book in 2010, in which he beautifully uses the technique of panorama to connect objects together. His photographs weave together the many aspects of Indian spirituality to present the complex spiritual scene for India for viewers. He continues to play with scale and detail, to explore larger than life expressions and transporting viewers into the location. Over a span of 8 years, Amit photographed Indians all over India in their domestic space. This study of the domestic scenarios of India culminated in India at home, released in 2016. From rural households to elegant palatial homes, Amit’s portrayals of 21st century homes are a bold and rich collection. This passionate photographer is now aiming at documenting the lesser-known India with his nuanced language.

Written by Riya Mahajan

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Gigi Scaria
CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Gigi Scaria
CONTEMPORARY ARTIST
Gigi Scaria
06-Gigi-Scaria-Jan-2018

 

Gigi Scaria is a Delhi based contemporary artist working in mixed media. Gigi who trained as a painter, has a Bachelor’s degree in painting from the College of Fine Arts, Thiruvananthapuram and a Master’s degree in Fine Arts from Jamia Millia University, New Delhi (1998). A person of multiple interests, he has continued to pursue his passion for filmmaking and sculpting as well. A wide chunk of his work is based on cities and migration and he uses powerful satire to convey his messages.

Gigi spoke about the transition Delhi witnessed as a city due to the upcoming Commonwealth Games. Malls and metros came into vogue and the face of the city changed drastically. Gigi’s work speaks a lot about the immediate environment we live in and the things and people it constitutes. His most prominent solo shows include ‘Settlement’ (2009) at Galerie Christian Hosp, Berlin; ‘Site Under Construction’ (2008), Budapest; ‘Triviality of everyday existence’ (2008) at the National Art Studio, Seoul; ‘Absence of an Architect’ (2007) at Palette Art Gallery, New Delhi; and ‘Where are the Amerindians?’ (2005) at CCA7, Trinidad. In his solo show, ‘Absence of an architect’ at Palette Gallery, New Delhi, Gigi highlighted the architectural state of Delhi at the time when he had migrated to the city. He spoke about the urban topographies and modern city structures leading to alienation and unsettlement. ‘Trivality of everyday Existence’ is a series of staged photographs taken in Korea. This body of work talks about the current situation where people interact with their phones more than they interact with the space or with each other. ‘Amusement Park’, displayed at Gallery Chemould in Mumbai, portrays the urban space as an amusement park. His video, ‘Pan(i)city’ is based on political realism and manifests his interest in working with images.

Written by Riya Mahajan

THEATRE DIRECTOR & LIGHTING DESIGNER
Zuleikha Chaudhari
THEATRE DIRECTOR & LIGHTING DESIGNER
Zuleikha Chaudhari
THEATRE DIRECTOR & LIGHTING DESIGNER
Zuleikha Chaudhari
07-Zuleikha-Allana-Jan-2018

  

Zuleikha Chaudhari is a theatre director and lighting designer. She uses archival documents such as texts and photographs to construct theatrical performances that investigate the relationships between memories from personal experiences and documented historical narratives. She explores ways of revival of the past and its reinterpretation through her approach. In her work Zuleikha combines reportage, portraiture, documentary and fiction. Navigating between observation and enactment, her work questions the role of performance in law and performativity of legal truth production.

Zuleikha and Khoj produced a petition to oppose the river linking project which had massive repercussions not only to the environment/ecosystem but also the people who would be affected by displacement caused by this large scale development. She presented a part of the theater performance she had staged which resulted in the above mentioned petition. This work was an attempt to connect a historical event with the current times by exploring parallels between law and art maintaining legal protocols as far as possible within the framework of theater production. This staged hearing consisted of three testimonies from real life artists who were witness, having a significant body of work on environmental issues. Each artist presented a testimony for 30 minutes along with 2 lawyers. The dialogue between the witness and the lawyer presented a passionate discourse which revolved around significant effects of the development proposed by the government. The process she adopted brought out interesting aspects. The ‘lawyers’ (actors who are real life lawyers) and the artists had several rehearsals but the judge was kept in the dark till the final performance. This forced the judge, also a real life judge, to hear out the testimonies for the first time and pass a real judgement on the day of the staged play. What was also interesting is that Zuleikha chose to stage the play at the Constitution Club of India. The selection of the venue was also critical as the Club keeps a record of the events that take place. Zuleikha has now been invited to stage the play in the Supreme Court. Her current projects include three court trials – The Bhawal Court Case (1930-46), The Trial of Bahadur Shah Zafar (1858) and the India National Army Trials (1945-46) – all within the framework of law as performance.

Written by Surajit Ranjan Das

THEATRE ARTIST
Mallika Taneja
THEATRE ARTIST
Mallika Taneja
THEATRE ARTIST
Mallika Taneja
08-Mallika-Taneja-Jan-2018

 

A Delhi based theatre artist, Mallika Taneja’s works tend to be shown in several contexts, generally influenced by where she comes from and defined by what she thinks the purpose of her work should be.

She began her presentation by sharing one of her early projects, a performance act called “Thoda Dhyan Se”. The nature of the performance did not lend itself to structured or open spaces. Thoda Dhyan Se was inspired by the Nirbhaya rape case. Therefore, when she initially started performing the piece, she moved around to several spaces and simply enacted her piece. The motive to perform the piece was further intensified after the Shakti Mills rape case which happened in Mumbai a year later.

Mallika’s work tends to evolve over time. Each time she gives a performance, there is a learning or modification which gets incorporated into the next. She explores the durations of her performances, plays with dialogue and silence, costume and light. The artist does not prefer showing her works in forums as she felt the true intensity of her work has its best impact when the audience watches her perform live. Taneja moved on to describe the “theatre scene” in the capital where there is plenty of scope. However, she finds the scene dominated by the National School of Drama, Delhi and regrets the lack of funding for independent artists like herself.

Taneja has performed at several national and international theatre festivals (including the Kerala Theatre Festival and Zurich Theatre Festival). She also performs for more intimate groups of people.

Written by Shivani Prakash

 

A Delhi based theatre artist, Mallika Taneja’s works tend to be shown in several contexts, generally influenced by where she comes from and defined by what she thinks the purpose of her work
should be.

She began her presentation by sharing one of her early projects, a performance act called “Thoda Dhyan Se”. The nature of the performance did not lend itself to structured or open spaces. Thoda Dhyan Se was inspired by the Nirbhaya rape case. Therefore, when she initially started performing the piece, she moved around to several spaces and simply enacted her piece. The motive to perform the piece was further intensified after the Shakti Mills rape case which happened in Mumbai a
year later.

Mallika’s work tends to evolve over time. Each time she gives a performance, there is a learning or modification which gets incorporated into the next. She explores the durations of her performances, plays with dialogue and silence, costume and light. The artist does not prefer showing her works in forums as she felt the true intensity of her work has its best impact when the audience watches her perform live. Taneja moved on to describe the “theatre scene” in the capital where there is plenty of scope. However, she finds the scene dominated by the National School of Drama, Delhi and regrets the lack of funding for independent artists like herself.

Taneja has performed at several national and international theatre festivals (including the Kerala Theatre Festival and Zurich Theatre Festival). She also performs for more intimate groups of people.

Written by Shivani Prakash

FILM MAKER
Vijay Jodha
FILM MAKER
Vijay Jodha
FILM MAKER
Vijay Jodha
09-Vijay-Jodha-Jan-2018

  

Vijay Jodha’s films have been broadcast in over 200 countries and over 75 channels including Discovery, PBS, BBC and CNN. A writer, filmmaker and photographer Jodha studied in fifteen institutions growing up and eventually lived across three continents. He did his masters from JNU in media and communications. Post-graduation, one of his early projects was the production of a book Kala on the concept of time for a leading design firm.

He then went to New York University to do filmmaking. Vijay’s life philosophy has always been to go beyond personal needs to address larger concerns that have a greater impact on society. He equally advocates collaborating or working for others who have a broader vision rather than looking at narrow personal gains. With a paucity of Indian foundations and sponsors that can fund art projects, it has been a continual challenge for this media artist to realize his ambitions, overcoming the biases and politics of funding agencies outside our country. In the 1990s, Jodha worked together with Sushil Srivastava and others, including getting inputs from primary sources like Romila Thapar towards an understanding of the Babri Masjid issue. This culminated in an exhibition at Teen Murti, a prestigious venue. One of their exhibits explored the multiple versions of the Ramayana, which has been reinterpreted in many parts of South East Asia, aside of the most popular versions by Tulsidas and Valmiki. While most of the information presented could not be disputed, as it was historical, protestors zeroed in on the exhibit of the Ramayana and destroyed that portion. An FIR lodged against Jodha and others took eight years to resolve. Jodha, however, has continued to daringly question and take up tricky issues – he credits his media school education where the motto was “Politics decide your future. Decide what your politics will be”. Most doctoral graduates, after their time at AIIMS go to the United States or well-known hospitals like Apollo. So, when a group of doctors decided to go to a poor tribal region of Chattisgarh, Jodha made 24 films for them.

The films were made in Chattisgarhi dialect to aid the team of doctors – who were dealing with very serious health issues – disseminate information. Jodha has published four books and he spoke about Ageless Mind and Spirit: Faces and Voices for the World of India’s Elderly, which was a collaboration with his brother Samar Jodha. Over eight years, the two brothers photographed and interviewed 400 people, whose stories are given equal attention across the pages. He compared the process with that of famous photographer Sebastiao Salgado, whose portraits of workers garnered attention across the world, but did not carry the names of the workers. Jodha questions how when we photograph the rich and famous, names become important, and why the poor or disadvantaged should deserve any less? Tiranga, a celebration of the Indian flag, was another collaborative venture by Vijay and Samar Jodha. Vijay concluded with his 6-minute short film Poop on Poverty. The film explores the popular tourist destination of Pushkar, which attracts huge crowds for the yearly camel fair. While tourists click away and Rajasthan’s portrait emerges as a colourful landscape of camels, people and desert, the other side of Pushkar is rarely seen where local women collect camel poop and dry it to make fuel in a bid for basic survival. Vijay’s film, which shows the chasm between classes and the disturbing reality of tourism and basic livelihoods, has won 14 international awards. On the side, Jodha observes how we Indians are not able to give credit to our own people, always relying on foreign agencies to recognize a good filmmaker, writer or artist. “It is a sad comment on us as a society”, concludes Jodha, who would like to see us all having more conviction in what we do.

Written by Sujatha Shankar Kumar

EMAIL

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mail us at info@lopezdesign.com

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mail us at careers@lopezdesign.com

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday



STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday