Forum No.24
7th Jul 2018

Forum No.24
7th Jul 2018

Forum No.24
7th Jul 2018

Forum No.24
7th Jul 2018

Forum No.24
7th Jul 2018

COLLABORATION | STRAIGHT OUTTA STREETS

COLLABORATION | STRAIGHT OUTTA STREETS

COLLABORATION | STRAIGHT OUTTA STREETS

COLLABORATION | STRAIGHT OUTTA STREETS

COLLABORATION | STRAIGHT OUTTA STREETS

Forum_21

ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini


FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani

ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini

FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani


ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini

FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani


ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini

FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani


ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini


FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani

HEAD OF ACADEMICS • PEARL ACADEMY 
Nidhip Mehta

ARCHITECT

Ranjeet Mukherjee

HEAD OF ACADEMICS • PEARL ACADEMY 
Nidhip Mehta

ARCHITECT

Ranjeet Mukherjee

HEAD OF ACADEMICS • PEARL ACADEMY 
Nidhip Mehta

ARCHITECT

Ranjeet Mukherjee

HEAD OF ACADEMICS • PEARL ACADEMY 
Nidhip Mehta

ARCHITECT

Ranjeet Mukherjee

HEAD OF ACADEMICS • PEARL ACADEMY 
Nidhip Mehta

ARCHITECT

Ranjeet Mukherjee

ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini
ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini
ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini
ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini
ARCHITECT
Saurabh Dakshini
Saurabh-Dakshini

 

Saurabh Dakshini, a Delhi-based contemporary architect, started his professional journey as an architecture student at Vastu Kala Academy, Delhi. For further studies, to get an understanding of architecture at a global level, he went to Bartlett School of Architecture in London. An independent free-thinker in the field of architecture, in 2006, Saurabh founded a studio of his own called Organon. ‘Organon’ which comes from the root word ‘organ’ means an instrument of thought or a system of logic. This accurately reflects the philosophy of the studio and Saurabh’s approach to design.

Saurabh has headed many architectural projects for the past twelve years. While choosing projects when a client approaches him, he looks primarily at the scope of experimentation. Saurabh explains how, in a field like architecture, where the projects are usually large scale with a lot of money at stake, one hardly gets to experiment a lot. You cannot challenge the norm at someone else’s cost and Saurabh operates within these constraints. In 2014, Organon designed a private residence with a wholly new approach. The overall design goal was to make voids into central spaces. The house is divided into four courtyards and is carefully designed keeping movement in mind, both through the day and over changing seasons. ‘Pocket Electric’ an early 2007 project, was commissioned by a brand that wanted a funky, alternative space to complement its progressive ethos. It was, as Saurabh calls it, the shortest project that he did, executed over a mere twenty days. It was also Organon’s first pop-up. The semi-urban locality that the pop-up was located in made it an unusual space for a luxury store. The studio took the challenge up and with a few innovations and pop references, created a funky, futuristic space.

Such ideas require a deep sense of imagination and the courage to experiment. Saurabh’s vision and the studio’s core beliefs are set up to follow an uncharted path. His work is an interesting amalgamation of traditional and futuristic. His solutions and the process he follows are clear proof, how a deep attachment to your work can bring about something incredible.

Written by Kokila Srivastava

FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani
FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani
FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani
FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani
FASHION DESIGNER
Himanshu Shani
Himanshu-Shani

  

Himanshu Shani, a fashion designer based in Delhi, is the proud co-founder of a fashion label named 11.11/ eleven eleven. As a young boy, Himanshu felt lost in the Indian schooling system. He did not know what he wanted from life. He was sure, though, it was definitely not related to what he was doing at school. When he got to high school, his cousin, who had just gotten into an architecture college, opened many new doors for him. Himanshu discovered a world beyond books. He applied at the National Institute of Fashion Technology and got selected by NIFT Gandhinagar. Since then, there was no looking back.

In his college, Himanshu would participate in every competition that he could. Some of them took him to places like Japan and Korea. On completing the program at NIFT, he got a scholarship to do his post graduation from Domus Academy, Milan. His thesis project was with Nokia, where they were researching how to connect lifestyle and fashion with the mobile phone, an everyday essential. Japanese designers like Issey Miyake and Ujima Motto and their will to innovate, inspired Himanshu the most. He got a chance to work with various big names who impacted his life at multiple levels and collaborated with others under his company CellDSGN, which he began in Milan in 2003. Eventually, he launched his own label eleven eleven in 2009, and partner Mia Morikawa joined in 2010. Each product they produce has some fresh element to it, which makes it stand out. Garment design, to Himanshu, is more like product design; every new addition should solve a purpose. One of the biggest innovations under the label 11.11/ eleven eleven is their Khadi denim. Himanshu believes that this is how denim would look if made in India, using Indian resources. It took the team around three to four years to make the fabric. They often use the ‘Bandhani’ technique on already stitched garments and leave the crushed texture as it is, which is also a new way of looking at the craft. Beyond the products, the artisans involved get the importance and the acknowledgment they deserve.

Himanshu’s journey to where he is today is all because of his never-ending enthusiasm and efforts to bring something new to the world. With revolutionary ideas, 11.11/eleven eleven’s clear vision is a good thing to hold on to, for many years to come.

Written by Kokila Srivastava

HEAD OF ACADEMICS AT PEARL ACADEMY
Nidhip Mehta
HEAD OF ACADEMICS AT PEARL ACADEMY
Nidhip Mehta
HEAD OF ACADEMICS AT PEARL ACADEMY
Nidhip Mehta
HEAD OF ACADEMICS AT PEARL ACADEMY
Nidhip Mehta
HEAD OF ACADEMICS AT PEARL ACADEMY

Nidhip Mehta
Nidhip-Mehta

  

Everybody talks about their successes but there are very few who speak about failures. Speaker Nidhip Mehta shared his story from learning design to becoming a designer. Today, Nidhip is the Head of the School of Design at Pearl, a premier institute in India. He has been an architect for the past twelve years but the story of how he became one is even more intriguing. Nidhip was born in Agra and like most North Indian children, spoke Hindi. He recalls his Gender Fluid photographs as a young boy in a frock. At the age of 3, he moved to the United States with his family. Slowly, language faded away and he stepped into the American lifestyle of proms and part-time jobs. He points out, “My parents, though, were still stuck in 1973”. Even while his cousins in India were dating in their teen years, he wasn’t allowed to do so. Queens, where he moved to in New York, was a very diverse area with a liberal community. His first encounter with racism was later, at the age of 11. In college as well, he found a nurturing environment. These early experiences brought a certain clarity – that he thrived in diversity. This was Life Lesson One.

Soon the family moved to New Jersey and then came the crucial time to decide the field he wanted to pursue. Nidhip was good at art but wanted to study medicine. His art teacher even suggested taking the middle ground as a medical illustrator. Soon after joining John Hopkins, he realised that medicine was a lot more theoretical, requiring studies in calculus and chemistry; these were subjects he wasn’t interested in and unable to do. His attempts to do better ended in failures, followed by a internal move to John Hopkins’ civil engineering department, where he was not able to cope up with the Maths and drafting classes. He was forced to leave John Hopkins. This was Life Lesson Two. 

At this point his best friend, who was ironically graduating early, invited Nidhip to Colorado to work in a ski resort. The people working there were just like him – dropouts who didn’t want to pursue studies anymore. It seemed like a good option to work here but his Indian DNA rebelled. It was now 1992. Nidhip sent out 152 letters to architecture firms but not a single one responded. He started volunteering as an architect and kept his CV just in case somebody chose to have a look. One day somebody did and that’s when he learned Lesson Number Three – “Don’t wait for them to call you.” He followed up, finally getting a project- based job at an architectural firm as a Autocad designer. In the evenings, he started attending Howard Community College, taking up courses he liked. His graph started moving upwards. After a few years, finally he joined NJIT for architecture. He was captivated by how something like poetry could also be transformed into a building structure. It took him ten years to graduate and this is what he tells his students when they worry about a gap year. At 38, he is now the head of an institution and can relate to every student. He understands that there are no bad students just bad teachers. More so, he hopes to make older generations understand the millennials better – and instead of creating clones of themselves to help students find who they are, truly.

Written by Nishita Karun

ARCHITECT
Ranjeet Mukherjee
ARCHITECT
Ranjeet Mukherjee
ARCHITECT
Ranjeet Mukherjee
ARCHITECT
Ranjeet Mukherjee
ARCHITECT
Ranjeet Mukherjee
Ranjeet-Mujherjee

  

Architect Ranjeet Mukherjee, an alumnus of The Faculty of Architecture, CEPT University, worked in Auroville for nearly 5 years before he founded the Gurgaon-based design studio ‘The Vrindavan Project’ in 2012.  Growing up, Ranjeet’s father had a transferable job. The experiences he gained in these early years, exposed to varied cultures and places inspired his creative yen. To overcome the academic instability because of frequent change of schools, Ranjeet joined Doon School in Dehradun. Later, he did his Bachelors in Architecture from CEPT and went on to pursue a Masters in Urban Planning from TU Delft. Finding his philosophy and school of thought was at variance with the academic programme, he dropped out of college and returned to India. Back home, Ranjeet came across books by Sri Aurobindo Ghosh and Swami Vivekananda, which inspired him to join the Auroville community.

Deindustrialization. Demechanization. Decentralization. Deregulation.

Deconstructing the commercialised norms of building, Ranjeet throws light on the importance of creating systems where the focus of development lies at a local level: a system where the power is not concentrated on one entity but shared in an ecosystem. His ideologies are very well-articulated and manifested in his practice. The project immediately following his tenure at Auroville is one of his best works – designing a farm house for his in-laws. The 11-acre project on a mango orchard site, was not only his ‘test of fire’ as he likes to call it – but a platform where he could express his beliefs of freedom – promoting local techniques, social development and choosing eco(logy) over ego. As Ranjeet explains, most project resources channelized through local context create social sustainability. Construction methodology came out of resource optimisation. Walls were made up of pressed earth, with plastering done only where required. He designed a long barrel-vaulted roofing structure to minimise use of concrete while ensuring healthy ventilation.

Since then, Ranjeet along with his interior-designer wife Shreenu moved to NCR and established his practice here. Crunch Patisserie, a commercial interior project in Gurgaon, is another acclaimed project where the idea of resource utilisation is of the same genre as the farm house.

The Vrindavan Project currently has many sub projects from various contexts currently underway. In each of those projects Ranjeet wants to take forward his ideologies and philosophies. The architect is also penning a philosophical book ‘Manu Script”. 

Written by Vinod Anthony Thomas

EMAIL

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mail us at info@lopezdesign.com

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ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday



STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday