Forum No.25
8th Sept 2018

Forum No.25
8th Sept 2018

Forum No.25
8th Sept 2018

Forum No.25
8th Sept 2018

Forum No.25
8th Sept 2018

COLLABORATION | IS OUT OF THIS WORLD

COLLABORATION | IS OUT OF THIS WORLD

COLLABORATION | IS OUT OF THIS WORLD

COLLABORATION | IS OUT OF THIS WORLD

Forum_22

ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG

VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur

CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh

ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG

VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur

CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh

ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG

VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur

CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh

ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG

VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur

CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh

ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG

VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur

CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh

JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Dhruv Raina

JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Dhruv Raina

JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Dhruv Raina

JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Dhruv Raina

JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Dhruv Raina

ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG
ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG
ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG
ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG
ARTIST
Arun Kumar HG
Arun-Kumar_WU

Twitter: @arunkumarhg

Arunkumar HG is a contemporary artist based in Gurgaon, specialising in sculpture. He completed his Bachelors and Masters degrees in Fine Art from the Faculty of Fine Arts, M. S. University of Baroda.

Arunkumar took us through his journey of how he evolved as an artist. Having spent a lot of time in the toy industry, his sculptures are often toy-like yet intricate, and carry a simple message. Although, at times, Arunkumar would challenge the dynamics of this relationship, and create art that would appear fairly basic yet carry a complex message. His work also gave the audience a glimpse of his fondness for the neo-pop movement.

From his time at MSU, Baroda, Arunkumar always challenged the traditional methods of sculpting, which led him to the idea of inflatable sculptures, which were made up of materials such as canvas, latex, rubber, foam and fibreglass. Another interesting collection of work he showed us was his photography of vegetables that strayed away from the conventional shape and form. While showing us his years of work, he also touched upon the subject of environmental awareness, and how he distributes his time between Gurgaon and his native village, marshalling environmental activists to help him spread the importance of sustainability.

Some of Arun’s solo shows include ‘Feed’ at Nature Morte, New Delhi and Sakshi Gallery, Mumbai, 2006; ‘Inflatable works’ at Nature Morte, New Delhi, 2001; and Studio Gallery, Garhi Artist Studio, New Delhi, 1997. Arunkumar is also an active member of Khoj Artist Collective, a contemporary arts organisation that facilitates international art dialogue and artist exchange. He has completed residences at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, in 2005, and the University of South Australia, Adelaide, in 2007.

Written by Joash Youtham

VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur
VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur
VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur
VISUAL ARTIST
Nupur Mathur
Nupur-Mathur_WU

Instagram: @nupur_mathur_

Nupur Mathur, a graduate of Rhode Island School of Design and an acclaimed artist, has had works exhibited in both print and electronic media in different cities across the world. At the Forum she shared her experiences and describes her professional journey across timelines.

Her first project was a collaboration with a renowned artist Bathsheba Okwenje, where she contributed to the dialogues of the documentary that primarily investigated gender-related violence and violence against women in India in particular. The three-month long project explores the theme from an urban middle class perspective. The thrust was on interaction with survivors and victims and to encourage them to share their experiences of instances of gender-based violence. The project crystallized into audio installations titled Reminiscence I and Reminiscence II, comprising of audioscapes made up of extracts of interviews loosely framed around topics of marriage, misogyny and patriarchy.

Her second project was yet another collaboration with Bathsheba. Set against the urban mosaic of Delhi, Addabaazi attempts to project the absence of women lazing around in chowpals, nukkad, idling joints and popular hangouts etc. Life size cut-outs of women were placed at such places to accentuate the absence of them with the intent to drive home the point that women of the city were either home or at work or transiting, but never idling away on the streets.

Her third collaboration is Radha May, a fictitious woman. Using tools borrowed from anthropologists, journalists and historians to conduct her research, Nupur defined a new methodology for creating an artform. Nupur, through Radha May, initiated a project When the Towel Drops, which is still ongoing. The long term transactional research-based art project is about societal values governing and influencing censorship of femininity, sensuality and sexuality in cinema and internet. Volume I focuses on Italy, as the research team was granted access to the film archives Cineteca di Bologna, a unique research centre in Italy. Original 35mm film cuts of movies from 1940-60s were analysed and censored scenes were edited and pieced together into new films. One of the installations incorporated 35mm films being reeled across four floors of the gallery using a custom designed roller mechanism, which aided projectors at key locations, projecting the films. Additionally, Project Radha May was able to access the documents justifying the expunged scenes. The intent here was to project the moments of transition of societal values and ethos of society post the World War,fascism and in an environment of overarching permeation of the dictates of the all-powerful clergy.

Radha May’s Volume II of research is based on Bollywood. National Archives Record Centre in Jaipur, which houses Central Board of Film Certification files from 1940s to late 1980s. These original files hold file notings of the deliberations and decisions made by the CBFC over the years and the letters written to and back from the production houses and even from the public to the CBFC.

Nupur sheds light on the changing world of censorship and art and draws attention to how censorship was quite liberal in India and how it has been evolving with modern challenges of internet and technological advancements since mid 1990s. The outcome of the Volume II research is yet to be seen.

Written by Vinod Anthony Thomas

CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh
CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh
CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh
CAREER COUNSELLOR
Shilpa Singh
Shilpa_WU

Instagram: @shilpa130313

Shilpa Singh is a Human Resources professional. Back when she was just starting off, she was in charge of hiring and firing people, which she enjoyed thoroughly. She headed human resources for a national level law firm where she got to interact with people of great educational pedigree. People with 0 to 10 years of experience had to go through her to get a job.

She observed that although these people seemed very promising on paper, they were in no shape to be put in front of a client due to lack of basic communication and presentation skills. She said that the issue started at the school level. The system was not helping people realise the importance of debate and questioning. Classroom education often led to studying by rote and memorising the subject matters, leaving much to be thoroughly understood. Shilpa felt pushed to do something about this. That is how Metamorphosis began.

The generation we are dealing with now are the millennials (age 15 – 35) and what matters the most to the millennials is the impact they are making when it comes to their legacy. She believes that teachers need to address the classroom keeping this in mind. This is the generation that is going to solve the previous generation’s shortcomings and it deserves the best training it can get to steer away from making common mistakes.

Shilpa explained that education as a system is very linear as of now. She emphasises that the current generation would greatly benefit from multidisciplinary thinking. This needs to be actioned in order to help the millennials think for themselves and not just memorise what they are being taught. This also helps people fit seamlessly at jobs rather than fitting a particular role perfectly. There is also a need to educate teachers about how to engage with students than just teaching a subject.

When it comes to helping students with choosing their career paths, Shilpa gives them the example of how chemotherapy which was earlier not a precise method of cancer treatment has advanced to become one. Patients who suffered throughout the primitive chemotherapy treatment will now have a better quality of life, live longer and stay in the market longer, not opening up the space for youngsters. This means that youth need to know a whole lot more than an adult to prove themselves.

By this illustration, she reminds students that it is important to keep an open mind while choosing subjects because combined knowledge is what works these days. She sums up her talk by telling youngsters that they cannot rely on their expertise in one area but they must know how all subjects are interconnected, and thus anticipate and acquire a holistic understanding.

Written by Agnisesh Setlur

JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler
JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler
JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler
JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler
JEWELLERY DESIGNER
Shannon Wissler
Shannon_WU

Instagram: @shannonwissler

Apparel designer, Shannon Wissler is presently based out of Delhi. Growing up in the United States, Shannon had a keen interest in contour development and preferred to make things with her hands. After finishing college, wanting to learn how a fashion business is run, she joined as a production assistant in a Zumba fitness outfit. Here, she gained a lot of experience matching fabric swatches, sourcing materials, taking measurements and catering to the needs of other designers.

77SS, an atelier of adornments started by her in 2012, primarily focused on one-of-a-kind products and customised women’s jewellery. Following her curiosity with moulding wires, Shannon created special gifts for friends and family. These explorations eventually grew into a full-blown passion. Shannon believes that her work in the jewellery design field gives her creative freedom. She is not bound by the standards of society but guided by the impulse to create something meaningful. Shannon, who enjoys the art of adornment looks forward each day to embark on projects that excite the soul of a woman – both young and old, with a playful, imaginative and sensual spirit.

The designer’s work is mostly driven, setting out to answer the 4 W’s – Who, What, Where and Why. Who are the people who inspire my work? What product am I making? Where am I getting my inspiration from? Why am I doing this?

Her work strongly portrays her sources of inspiration, which are extremely unique. Of the few collections she shared, one was inspired by a stark and structured form of functionalist architecture, where the fluidity and entropy in her designs are similar to that of buildings. The merger of two contrasts result in the balanced design featured in the collection.

Written by Jigyasa Thukral

PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Dhruv Raina
PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Dhruv Raina
PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Dhruv Raina
PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Dhruv Raina
PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Dhruv Raina
Dhruv-Raina_WU

  

Dhruv Raina, Professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, teaches the history and philosophy of science. He studied physics at Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai and received his PhD in the philosophy of science from Göteborg University.

A question which has puzzled many in the scientific community, is why western nations progressed faster, advancing in technology, while most inventions had roots in India and China. Addressing this predominant quandary, Dhruv touched upon the issues of social context, recalling the 1970s-1980s trend of “Technology Transfer” wherein it was proposed that technology could exist without context. Dhruv contradicts this theory, that you could pick up a piece of technology from one part of the world and place it in another and expect it to work perfectly. He gave the example of the invention of barbed wire in America, following the discovery of galvanising cheap metal. This invention was revolutionary for America. But when it moved to the British Union, it failed miserably. Dhruv quoted Charles Spencer “The fox continued to survive but the aristocracy disappeared” to illustrate how barbed wire fencing of estates in Britain led to the game of fox hunting (which was a communal event) dying down – contributing to the already diminishing British aristocracy.

Understanding this helped us see how technology has different consequences based on social values, varying with the signature model of that particular society. But, how do technology and society depend on each other, who follows who? Moving forward, Dhruv discussed the two myths of technology on which all advances are based. The first is the Myth of Autonomy, which states that all technology is free of any human intervention. This was challenged by the statement – Guns don’t kill people, people kill people. The second was the myth of neutrality, which states that technology behaves the same with everybody. This too was concluded as false because a gun will be used differently by a person depending on his scenario.

Marxists believe if the means of production were controlled, then the benefits of technology would be true because cost trumps purpose. By debunking myths like these, the idea of socialist technology came forward. Following which, people started asking three questions before designing anything. First, does it cater to the needs of the people, two, is it environment-friendly and three, if it uses local resources? Dhruv ended his talk by speaking about how leaders like Gandhi who subscribed to the Luddite philosophy are also important to technological advance, because their thinking at cross-purposes identifies what the glitches are. Dhruv’s most recent work addresses the contemporary concerns of the circulation of concepts in the social sciences, the emergence of inter- and trans-disciplinary fields of research.

Written by Nishita Karun

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ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

 

ADDRESS

Lopez Design Pvt. Ltd.
B - 558, Sushant Lok Phase 1,
Gurugram, Harayana - 122022

CALL
0124-4921810, 4923148

 

STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday



STUDIO TIMINGS

10AM - 7PM
Monday - Friday